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1 April 2008 Spatial and Temporal Variation in Natural Enemy Assemblages on Maryland Native Plant Species
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Abstract

Habitat manipulation is a branch of conservation biological control in which vegetation complexity and diversity are increased in managed landscapes to provide food and other resources for arthropod natural enemies. This is often achieved by maintaining noncrop plant material such as flowering strips and beetle banks that provide natural enemies with nectar and pollen, alternative prey, shelter from disturbance, and overwintering sites. In most cases, plant material used in habitat manipulation programs is not native to the area in which it is planted. Using native plant species in conservation biological control could serve a dual function of suppressing pest arthropod outbreaks and promoting other valuable ecosystem services associated with native plant communities. We evaluated 10 plant species native to Maryland for their attractiveness to foliar and ground-dwelling natural enemies. Plants that showed particular promise were Monarda punctata, Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, and Eupatorium hyssopifolium, which generally harbored the greatest abundance of foliar predators and parasitoids, although abundance varied over time. Among ground-dwelling natural enemies, total predator and parasitoid abundance differed between plant species, but carabid and spider abundance did not. Matching certain plant species and their allied natural enemies with specific pest complexes may be enhanced by identifying the composition of natural enemy assemblages at different times of year and in both foliar and ground habitat strata.

Steven D. Frank, Paula M. Shrewsbury, and Okemeteri Esiekpe "Spatial and Temporal Variation in Natural Enemy Assemblages on Maryland Native Plant Species," Environmental Entomology 37(2), 478-486, (1 April 2008). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X(2008)37[478:SATVIN]2.0.CO;2
Received: 15 October 2007; Accepted: 21 January 2008; Published: 1 April 2008
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