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1 October 2010 The Influence of Forest Stand and Site Characteristics on the Composition of Exotic Dominated Ambrosia Beetle Communities (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)
Sharon E. Reed, R. M. Muzika
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Abstract

Economic and biological consequences are associated with exotic ambrosia beetles and their fungal associates. Despite this, knowledge of ambrosia beetles and their ecological interactions remain poorly understood, especially in the oak—hickory forest region. We examined how forest stand and site characteristics influenced ambrosia beetle habitat use as evaluated by species richness and abundance of ambrosia beetles, both the native component and individual exotic species. We documented the species composition of the ambrosia beetle community, flight activity, and habitat use over a 2-yr period by placing flight traps in regenerating clearcuts and older oak—hickory forest stands differing in topographic aspect. The ambrosia beetle community consisted of 20 species with exotic ambrosia beetle species dominating the community. Similar percentages of exotic ambrosia beetles occurred among the four forest habitats despite differences in stand age and aspect. Stand characteristics, such as stand age and forest structure, influenced ambrosia beetle richness and the abundances of a few exotic ambrosia beetle species and the native ambrosia beetle component. Topographic aspect had little influence on ambrosia beetle abundance or species richness. Older forests typically have more host material than younger forests and our results may be related to the amount of dead wood present. Different forms of forest management may not alter the percent contribution of exotic ambrosia beetles to the ambrosia beetle community.

© 2010 Entomological Society of America
Sharon E. Reed and R. M. Muzika "The Influence of Forest Stand and Site Characteristics on the Composition of Exotic Dominated Ambrosia Beetle Communities (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)," Environmental Entomology 39(5), 1482-1491, (1 October 2010). https://doi.org/10.1603/EN09374
Received: 22 December 2009; Accepted: 12 July 2010; Published: 1 October 2010
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KEYWORDS
flight activity
habitat
oak—hickory forest
Xyleborus
Xylosandrus
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