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1 October 2015 A Binary Host Plant Volatile Lure Combined with Acetic Acid to Monitor Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
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Abstract

Field studies were conducted in the United States, Hungary, and New Zealand to evaluate the effectiveness of septa lures loaded with ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) and (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (nonatriene) alone and in combination with an acetic acid co-lure for both sexes of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.). Additional studies were conducted to evaluate these host plant volatiles and acetic acid in combination with the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone). Traps baited with pear ester/nonatriene acetic acid placed within orchards treated either with codlemone dispensers or left untreated caught significantly more males, females, and total moths than similar traps baited with pear ester acetic acid in some assays. Similarly, traps baited with codlemone/pear ester/nonatriene acetic acid caught significantly greater numbers of moths than traps with codlemone/pear ester acetic acid lures in some assays in orchards treated with combinational dispensers (dispensers loaded with codlemone/pear ester). These data suggest that monitoring of codling moth can be marginally improved in orchards under variable management plans using a binary host plant volatile lure in combination with codlemone and acetic acid. These results are likely to be most significant in orchards treated with combinational dispensers. Significant increases in the catch of female codling moths in traps with the binary host plant volatile blend plus acetic acid should be useful in developing more effective mass trapping strategies.

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is witten by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
A. L. Knight, E. Basoalto, J. Katalin, and A. M. El-Sayed "A Binary Host Plant Volatile Lure Combined with Acetic Acid to Monitor Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)," Environmental Entomology 44(5), 1434-1440, (1 October 2015). https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvv116
Received: 29 April 2015; Accepted: 24 June 2015; Published: 1 October 2015
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