Translator Disclaimer
17 March 2022 Native Flowering Border Crops Attract High Pollinator Abundance and Diversity, Providing Growers the Opportunity to Enhance Pollination Services
Jessica Butters, Ebony Murrell, Brian J. Spiesman, Tania N. Kim
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Over the past century, habitat loss from agricultural intensification has contributed to pollinator decline. One way to mitigate the harmful effects of agricultural intensification is through the re-introduction of native flowering plants as border strips that provide supplemental floral and nesting resources to pollinators. However, border crop species vary in bloom period and flower densities, and are thus likely to attract different suites of pollinator species. Resulting differences in pollinator community composition are likely to affect their ability to provide pollination services to adjacent crop habitat. To address these issues, we implemented a two-year study on the impact of different flowering border crops on pollinator abundance, richness, and community composition. We also examined which crop features (bloom duration, number of flowers, floral area) were most likely to affect pollinator densities. We found that native flowering plant border crops of diverse prairie mix and monocultures of silflower (Silphium integrifolium Michx.) and cup plant (Silphium perfoliatum L.) attracted the highest abundance and species richness of bees and pollinator groups combined, while alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) attracted the highest lepidopteran abundance and species richness. We also found a significant, positive relationship between pollinator abundance and floral resource amount and bloom duration. These findings offer valuable insight into the impacts of different land management strategies on different pollinator groups, and thus provide landowners with management options for attracting specific pollinator groups and species.

© The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Jessica Butters, Ebony Murrell, Brian J. Spiesman, and Tania N. Kim "Native Flowering Border Crops Attract High Pollinator Abundance and Diversity, Providing Growers the Opportunity to Enhance Pollination Services," Environmental Entomology 51(2), 492-504, (17 March 2022). https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvac013
Received: 28 August 2021; Accepted: 8 February 2022; Published: 17 March 2022
JOURNAL ARTICLE
13 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
border crop
floral resource
Hedgerow
pollinator
sustainable Agriculture
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top