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1 October 2000 A LONG-TERM STUDY ON SEASONAL CHANGES OF GAMETIC DISEQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN ALLOZYMES AND INVERSIONS IN DROSOPHILA SUBOBSCURA
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Abstract

Seasonal variation (spring, early summer, late summer, and autumn) of gametic disequilibrium between gene arrangements (OST and O3 4) of the O chromosome and Lap, Pept-1, and Acph allozyme loci, located inside these inversions, has been recorded in a natural population of Drosophila subobscura during seven years over a 15-year period. The length of the study allowed us to investigate the temporal variation of the allozyme-inversion associations by statistical methods of time series analysis. Cyclic seasonal changes of allozyme-inversion associations for both Lap and Pept-1 are detected in the natural population. In both cases, the patterns of seasonal change are due to the seasonal change of frequency of Lap and Pept-1 allozymes occurring exclusively within the OST gene arrangement. In contrast, the allozyme frequencies at these loci within the O3 4 gene arrangement are stable along seasons. The patterns of temporal variation of allozyme-inversion associations for Lap and Pept-1 in the natural population are contrasted with those previously published that correspond to gene arrangements of the O chromosome and nucleotide polymorphism at the rp49 region located inside these inversions, suggesting that natural selection is operating on these allozyme-inversion associations.

Corresponding Editor: L. Nunney

Carlos Zapata, Gonzalo Alvarez, Francisco Rodríguez-Trelles, and Xulio Maside "A LONG-TERM STUDY ON SEASONAL CHANGES OF GAMETIC DISEQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN ALLOZYMES AND INVERSIONS IN DROSOPHILA SUBOBSCURA," Evolution 54(5), 1673-1679, (1 October 2000). https://doi.org/10.1554/0014-3820(2000)054[1673:ALTSOS]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 October 2000
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