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1 July 2002 PERSPECTIVE: HERE'S TO FISHER, ADDITIVE GENETIC VARIANCE, AND THE FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF NATURAL SELECTION
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Abstract

Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection, that the rate of change of fitness is given by the additive genetic variance of fitness, has generated much discussion since its appearance in 1930. Fisher tried to capture in the formula the change in population fitness attributable to changes of allele frequencies, when all else is not included. Lessard's formulation comes closest to Fisher's intention, as well as this can be judged. Additional terms can be added to account for other changes. The “theorem” as stated by Fisher is not exact, and therefore not a theorem, but it does encapsulate a great deal of evolutionary meaning in a simple statement. I also discuss the effectiveness of reproductive-value weighting and the theorem in integrated form. Finally, an optimum principle, analogous to least action and Hamilton's principle in physics, is discussed.

James F. Crow "PERSPECTIVE: HERE'S TO FISHER, ADDITIVE GENETIC VARIANCE, AND THE FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF NATURAL SELECTION," Evolution 56(7), (1 July 2002). https://doi.org/10.1554/0014-3820(2002)056[1313:PHSTFA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 22 January 2002; Accepted: 14 May 2002; Published: 1 July 2002
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