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1 June 2005 QUANTITATIVE GENETIC ANALYSIS OF PLANT GROWTH: BIASES ARISING FROM VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION
Kent E. Schwaegerle
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Abstract

Propagation through vegetative cuttings is a widely used technique that may bias estimates of genetic and environmental effects on plant growth. Leafy stem cuttings from 210 genotypes from eight populations of Salix pulchra were rooted and raised at three levels of nitrogen availability. Cuttings showed a complex suite of responses to vegetative propagation. Population and/or genotypic variation in response to vegetative propagation was observed in (1) retention of leaves during rooting, (2) date that cuttings resumed shoot growth after rooting, and (3) the frequency of cuttings that remained shoot dormant throughout the experiment. Nitrogen treatments also caused different responses to vegetative propagation, influencing date that cuttings resumed shoot growth and frequency of shoot dormancy. Because each of these responses had a direct effect on final plant size, I concluded that final size was a product of both differences among genotypes and treatments in plant growth rate, as well as genotype- and treatment-specific responses to vegetative propagation. This study shows that plant growth experiments can be designed to quantify responses to vegetative propagation and statistically remove these artifacts of propagation from estimates of genetic and environmental effects on plant growth.

Kent E. Schwaegerle "QUANTITATIVE GENETIC ANALYSIS OF PLANT GROWTH: BIASES ARISING FROM VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION," Evolution 59(6), 1259-1267, (1 June 2005). https://doi.org/10.1554/04-435
Received: 13 July 2004; Accepted: 25 February 2005; Published: 1 June 2005
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KEYWORDS
Clonal propagation
nutrient stress
path analysis
plant growth
QUANTITATIVE GENETICS
vegetative propagation response
VPR effects
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