Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2006 THE STABILITY OF P IN CORAL REEF FISHES
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The constancy of phenotypic variation and covariation is an assumption that underlies most recent investigations of past selective regimes and attempts to predict future responses to selection. Few studies have tested this assumption of constancy despite good reasons to expect that the pattern of phenotypic variation and covariation may vary in space and time. We compared phenotypic variance-covariance matrices (P) estimated for populations of six species of distantly related coral reef fishes sampled at two locations on Australia's Great Barrier Reef separated by more than 1000 km. The intraspecific similarity between these matrices was estimated using two methods: matrix correlation and common principal component analysis. Although there was no evidence of equality between pairs of P, both statistical approaches indicated a high degree of similarity in morphology between the two populations for each species. In general, the hierarchical decomposition of the variance-covariance structure of these populations indicated that all principal components of phenotypic variance-covariance were shared but that they differed in the degree of variation associated with each of these components. The consistency of this pattern is remarkable given the diversity of morphologies and life histories encompassed by these species. Although some phenotypic instability was indicated, these results were consistent with a generally conserved pattern of multivariate selection between populations.

Edward T. Game and M. Julian Caley "THE STABILITY OF P IN CORAL REEF FISHES," Evolution 60(4), 814-823, (1 April 2006). https://doi.org/10.1554/05-318.1
Received: 15 June 2005; Accepted: 1 February 2006; Published: 1 April 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
10 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top