Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2006 SELECTIVE TRADE-OFFS AND SEX-CHROMOSOME EVOLUTION IN SILENE LATIFOLIA
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Alleles of sexually antagonistic genes (i.e., genes with alleles affecting fitness in opposite directions in the two sexes) can avoid expression in the sex to which they are detrimental via two processes: they are subsumed into the nonrecombining, sex-determining portion of the sex chromosomes or they evolve sex-limited expression. The former is considered more likely and leads to Y-chromosome degeneration. We mapped quantitative trait loci of major effect for sexually dimorphic traits of Silene latifolia to the recombining portions of the sex chromosomes and found them to exhibit sex-specific expression, with the Y chromosome in males controlling a relatively larger proportion of genetic variance than the X in females and the average autosome. Both reproductive and ecophysiological traits map to the recombining region of the sex chromosomes. We argue that genetic correlations among traits maintain recombination and polymorphism for these genes because of balancing selection in males, whereas sex-limited expression represses detrimental alleles in females. Our data suggest that the Y chromosome of S. latifolia plays a major role in the control of key metabolic activities beyond reproductive functions.

Ivan Scotti and Lynda F. Delph "SELECTIVE TRADE-OFFS AND SEX-CHROMOSOME EVOLUTION IN SILENE LATIFOLIA," Evolution 60(9), (1 September 2006). https://doi.org/10.1554/05-698.1
Received: 19 December 2005; Accepted: 14 June 2006; Published: 1 September 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top