Translator Disclaimer
1 February 2008 Rapid Parasite Adaptation Drives Selection for High Recombination Rates
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that sex is maintained through selection pressure imposed by coevolving parasites: susceptible hosts are able to escape parasite pressure by recombining their genome to create resistant offspring. However, previous theoretical studies have shown that the Red Queen typically selects against sex unless selection is strong, arguing that high rates of recombination cannot evolve when parasites are of low virulence. Here we show that under the biologically plausible assumption of a severe fitness cost for parasites that fail to infect, the Red Queen can cause selection for high recombination rates, and that the strength of virulence is largely irrelevant to the direction of selection for increased recombination rates. Strong selection on parasites and short generation times make parasites usually better adapted to their hosts than vice versa and can thus favor higher recombination rates in hosts. By demonstrating the importance of host-imposed selection on parasites, our findings resolve previously reported conflicting results.

Marcel Salathé, Roger D. Kouyos, Roland R. Regoes, and Sebastian Bonhoeffer "Rapid Parasite Adaptation Drives Selection for High Recombination Rates," Evolution 62(2), 295-300, (1 February 2008). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00265.x
Received: 20 March 2007; Accepted: 17 September 2007; Published: 1 February 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top