Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2008 SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IS ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION FITNESS IN THE SEED BEETLE CALLOSOBRUCHUS MACULATUS
Abstract

The population consequences of sexual selection remain empirically unexplored. Comparative studies, involving extinction risk, have yielded different results as to the effect of sexual selection on population densities make contrasting predictions. Here, we investigate the relationship between sexual dimorphism (SD) and population productivity in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using 13 populations that have evolved in isolation. Geometric morphometric methods and image analysis are employed to form integrative measures of sexual dimorphism, composed of variation in weight, size, body shape, and pigmentation. We found a positive relationship between SD and adult fitness (net adult offspring production) across our study populations, but failed to find any association between SD and juvenile fitness (egg-to-adult survival). Several mechanisms may have contributed to the pattern found, and variance in sexual selection regimes across populations, either in female choice for “good genes” or in the magnitude of direct benefits provided by their mates, would tend to produce the pattern seen. However, our results suggest that evolutionary constraints in the form of intralocus sexual conflict may have been the major generator of the relationship seen between SD and population fitness.

"SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IS ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION FITNESS IN THE SEED BEETLE CALLOSOBRUCHUS MACULATUS," Evolution 62(3), 622-630, (1 March 2008). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00315.x
Received: 10 June 2007; Accepted: 4 December 2007; Published: 1 March 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
Bruchidae
intralocus conflict
larval fitness
mating system
population density
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top