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20 May 2011 Chapter 3: Context and Relevance
John Edward Terrell, Kevin O. Pope, James R. Goff
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Abstract

Given what is now known or may be reasonably inferred about the geomorphological development of the northern shoreline of New Guinea—the second-largest island in the world with a land area of about 808,000 km2—this island has played a previously unexpected role in the prehistory of the Pacific, first as “barrier” and then later as “bridge” (or perhaps, more accurately, as “voyaging corridor”) between island Southeast Asia and Oceania. However, our field investigations since 1990 have shown us that people living on this tectonically unstable coastline have developed specific ways to handle the challenges of living in such a hazardous and changing environment. One of these strategies is the locally well-established institution of inherited friendship (more commonly referred to in the anthropological literature as “trade partnership”). The second, as yet still insufficiently documented on this coast, is the transgenerational management of resources.

John Edward Terrell, Kevin O. Pope, and James R. Goff "Chapter 3: Context and Relevance," Fieldiana Anthropology 2011(42), 21-28, (20 May 2011). https://doi.org/10.3158/0071-4739-42.1.21
Published: 20 May 2011
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