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1 December 2014 Contribution to Knowledge of the Dermestidae (Coleoptera) from Afghanistan with Description of Three New Species
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Three new species Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov., Orphinus (s. str.) kabakovi sp. nov., Ctesias (Decemctesias) mroczkowskii sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Demestidae) are described from Afghanistan. The habitus, antenna, genitalia are illustrated and compared with related species. The species Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954 and Anthrenus (Anthrenodes) amoenulus Reitter, 1896 are newly recorded from Afghanistan. Morphological details with dorsal variability of Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954 are illustrated for the first time. A revised list of the species from Afghanistan is given.

The knowledge about Dermestidae of Afghanistan, located mainly in Central Asia, is still poor and undoubtedly requires further study. The list of available references is small. Most of them include short lists of the species recorded from Afghanistan so far (Mroczkowski 1959, 1960, 1961a, b). Recent papers with the descriptions of a new species are infrequent and were provided by Mroczkowski (1959 — description of Anthrenus lindbergi; 1961b — descriptions of 2 species of Ctesias spp.), John (1964 — descriptions of 8 species of Thorictus spp.) and Kadej & Háva (2006 — description of 2 species of Anthrenus spp.). Fifty seven species have been recorded from Afghanistan. Together, the species represent 13 of 62 genera of Dermestidae established so far. The study of the materials from Russian Academy of Science allowed us to find and describe new species, as well as supplement our knowledge about distribution of some of the skin beetles species.

Materials and Methods

Morphological structures were boiled for 3–10 min in 10% KOH, and placed in distilled water for about 1 h to clean and soften the cuticle. All structures were placed in glycerin mounts. Morphological structures were examined by a Nikon Eclipse E 600® (Tokyo, Japan) phase contrast microscope, and a Nikon SMZ—800® (Tokyo, Japan) binocular microscope. Photographs were taken by a Canon 500D® (Taiwan) and a Nikon D5100® (Tokyo, Japan) camera under a Nikon Eclipse 80i® (Tokyo, Japan) and/or a Nikon SMZ—800® (Tokyo, Japan). Image stacks were processed using Combine ZM® (Hadley 2010).

The distribution and the classification we used follow the world catalogues of Háva (2003, 2007).

The type specimens were each labelled with a red printed label bearing the following text: “HOLOTYPE [PARATYPE respectively, Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. Háva & Kadej det. 2014; Or phinus (s. str.) kabakovi sp. nov. Háva & Kadej det. 2014; Ctesias (Decemctesias) mroczkowskii sp. nov. Háva & Kadej det. 2014”.

The following abbreviations were used in this study:

DBEIC Department of Invertebrate Biology, Evolution and Conservation, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biological Science, University of Wrocław, Poland.

JHAC Private Entomological Laboratory & Collection, Jiří Háva, Prague-West, Czech Republic.

ZIN Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg, Russia.

Results

Orphilinae LeConte, 1861
Orphilini LeConte, 1861
Orphilus Erichson, 1846
Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. (Figs. 18)

  • Type Material

    HOLOTYPE (male): AFGHANISTAN, Nurestan N Waygal, 2700m, 7 VII 1972, Kabakov lgt., (ZIN); PARATYPES: 2 exx. (females): Afghanistan, Nurestan N Waygal, 2700m, 7 VII 1972, Kabakov lgt., (1 ZIN, 1 JHAC); 1 ex. (female): Afghanistan, Nurestan SW Čapa-Dera, 1500m, 11.6.1971, Kabakov lgt., (ZIN).

  • Description

    Measurements for holotype: length from anterior margin of pronotum to apex of elytron 3.7 mm; maximum width across elytra 2.05 mm; median length of pronotum 1.05 mm; maximum width of pronotum 2.0 mm; maximum length of sternites I–V 1.6 mm; maximum width of sternites I–V 1.8 mm; length of lateral margin of pronotum 0.9 mm; length of antennal fossa 0.75 mm [legs of third pair broken, tarsus of first left leg lost]; measurements for paratypes: length from anterior margin of pronotum to apex of elytron 4.1 mm; maximum width across elytra 2.4 mm; median length of pronotum 1.15 mm; maximum width of pronotum 2.25 mm; maximum length of sternites 1.65 mm; maximum width of sternites I–V 2.25 mm; length of lateral margin of pronotum 0.95 mm; length of antennal fossa 0.8 mm. Body subovate; nerly 2 times as long as wide. Head, antennae and legs retractile. Dorsum without dorsal patterns or elytral fasciae; dorsal and ventral surface unicolorous black (Figs. 1 and 2). Cuticle smooth, shining, densely punctated. Head with large compound eyes; median ocellus distinct and well developed. Frons with short pubescence and gently punctation. Antenna 11-segmented; brown (first antennomer and segments of antennal club darker than the rest of antennomeres (Fig. 3). Antennal club of 3 segments (Fig. 3). Antennal fossa deeply excavate and occupy greater part of hypomeron. Pronotum convex, gently punctate with distinct lateral margin visible from above (Fig. 1). Scutellum triangular, black, small and poorly marked, without punctation. Elytra parallel-sided, each elytron densely punctated, those punctures larger than on pronotum. Humeral calli well developed and visible. All of the elytral area covered with brownish, short pubescence (it is visible under microscope). Elytral suture slightly convex at half of it's length. Abdomen densely punctated, punctures distinctly denser on 2nd to 5th visible sternite, and with sublateral distal carinae on 1st visible sternite. Abdominal sternites I–V covered with short brownish pubescence; setation longer on 1st visible sternite (Fig. 2). Legs covered with stout, brownish setation. Tarsi lighter than tibia and femora; femora without distinct teeth (tibial spines). Tarsus with 2 tarsal-claws. Phallus as in Figs. 4–6. Parameres deeply U-shaped, covered with few, short setae on the lateral margins as well as in the central and inner areas; longer setae present only on apex of parameres. Distal parts of parameres thinner than the rest part of parameres. Penis with distal end pointing up (Figs. 4–6); in frontal view straight (Fig. 4), in lateral distinctly curved in a basal part above narrow and short apodemes (Fig. 5). Shape of ninth abdominal sternite oval-like (Fig. 7). Apex slightly elongated and rounded. Setae present on the top and lateral margins, but only in the anterior part. Tenth abdominal sternite as in Fig. 8.

    Dimorphism. Females habitually similar to males. Sexual dimorphism not observed, thus to distinguish both sexes dissection of genitalia is required.

  • Differential Diagnosis

    Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. is similar to O. niger (Rossi, 1790) and O. beali Zhantiev, 2000 but differs from them by the morphology of male genitalia, pronotum and antennae.

    Morphology of parameres: In Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. the apices of parameres slightly narrowed, acute and not curved to inner, lateral margins of parameres in the middle not widened, median lobe narrow; in O. niger apices of parameres slightly narrowed, rounded and curved to the inner side, lateral margins of parameres in the middle widened; while in O. beali parameres are widened in the middle and strongly narrowed apically.

    Morphology of pronotum: In Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. the lateral margin distinctly visible from above in basal third; in O. niger lateral margin visible from above in basal third but the deflection is smaller in comparison with O. kabakovi; while in O. beali lateral margin not visible from above in basal third.

    Morphology of antennae: In Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov. the last antennal segment elongated and convex, while flattened in O. niger and O. beali.

  • Etymology

    The epithet is a patronym honoring the collector of the beetles — O. N. Kabakov (St. Petersburg, Russia).

  • Remarks

    Genus Orphilus recently includes only 6 species. One of them—O. dubius Wickham, 1912—represents fossil species (Early Oligocene: Florissant). The rest of the known species have been recorded mainly in Nearctic or Palaearctic region (Háva 2003, 2007). The knowledge about biology and ecology of the Orphilus species is limited only to information provided by Beal (1985) and Zhantiev (2001). The description of immatures stages have been given by Paulian (1943), Beal (1985, 1991), Zhantiev (2001) and Kiselyova & McHugh, 2006.

  • Figs. 1–3.

    Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov., holotype. 1, habitus, dorsal; 2, abdominal sternites I–V; 3, left antenna.

    f01_1414.jpg

    Figs. 4–8.

    Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov., holotype. 4, male genitalia, ventral; 5, male genitalia, lateral; 6, male genitalia, dorso-lateral; 7, abdominal sternite IX; 8, abdominal sternite X.

    f04_1414.jpg

    Attageninae Laporte de Castelnau, 1840
    Attagenini Laporte de Castelnau, 1840
    Attagenus Latreille, 1802
    Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954 (Figs. 919)

  • Material Examined

    Afghanistan, Laghman E Šamakat, 1,100m, 20 IV 1972, Kabakov lgt., 6 exx., (ZIN, DBEIC, JHAC); Afghanistan, Laghman O Šamakat, 1,300m, 17.9.1972, Kabakov lgt., 2 exx., (ZIN).

  • Distribution

    India: Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh; Nepal (Háva 2007). New record for Afghanistan.

  • Remarks

    Redescription with some additional drawings of larval and adult morphology of A. indicus has been made by Veer & Rao (1995). Figures 9, 11–12 show the spectrum of color variability of the dorsal patterns. Because Vladimír Kalík did not attach any drawings or photographs of this species in his original description (Kalik 1954), the morphology of A. indicus is richly illustrated with photographs for the first time (Figs. 919). Due to lack of the differential diagnosis in Kalík's original description we decided to provide additional characters which differentiate A. indicus from similar species such as A. farsus Háva, 2012 below:

    In A. indicus Kalík, 1954: antenna yellowishbrown; pubescence on dorsal and ventral integument short; integument of anterior transverse fasciae on elytra yellowish and the same as apical spot covered with golden-yellow pubescence; apical spot isolated. In contrast, in A. farsus Háva, 2012, the antenna dark brown; pubescence on dorsal and ventral integument long; integument of anterior transverse fasciae on elytra orangereddish and the same as apical fasciae covered with grey pubescence; apical fasciae not isolated.

  • Figs. 9–13.

    Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954, habitus. 9, 11 male, dorsal; 12, female, dorsal; 10, 13 ventral.

    f09_1414.jpg

    Subfamily Megatominae Leach, 1815
    Tribe Anthrenini Gistel, 1848
    Genus Anthrenus Geoffroy, 1762
    Anthrenus (Anthrenodes) amoenulus Reitter, 1896

  • Material Examined

    Afghanistan, Oruzgan, N Sahzestan 2,500 m, 18.vii.1970, Kabakov lgt., 1 spec., M. Kadej & J. Háva det., (ZIN); Afghanistan, Oruzgan, N Sahzestan 2,500 m, 18.7.1970, Kabakov lgt., 1 spec., M. Kadej & J. Háva det., (ZIN).

  • Distribution

    Species known from Caspian Lowlands, “Caucasus”, Iran, Turkey, Turkmenistan (Háva 2007); new for Afghanistan.

  • Tribe Megatomini Leach, 1815
    Genus Orphinus Motschulsky, 1858a
    Orphinus (Orphinus) kabakovi sp. nov. (Figs. 2029)

  • Type material

    HOLOTYPE (male): AFGANISTAN, 30 km O Jalalbad 500 m 20.12.1970 Kabakov lgt. (ZIN).

  • Description

    Measurements for holotype: length from anterior margin of pronotum to apex of elytron 2.3 mm; maximum width across elytra 1.15 mm; median length of pronotum 0.55 mm; maximum width of pronotum 2.25 mm; maximum length of sternites I–V 1.1 mm; maximum width of sternites I–V 1.25 mm; length of lateral margin of pronotum 0.4 mm; length of antennal fossa 0.3 mm. Body oval, slightly convex, densely clothed with simple and relatively long hairs (Fig. 20). Punctuation of body visible; those punctures on elytra better marked than on pronotum. Ratio of width (across humeri) to length (of pronotum and elytra combined) 1:2. Dorsal integument bicolorous — dark brown and light brown; while ventral unicolor — dark brown. Antennae light brown (only first antennomeres darker than the rest); legs brown but tibiae and tarsi lighter than femora and trochanters (Fig. 21). Dorsal and ventral integument with light brownish pubescence (Figs. 20, 21, 23). Head with large compound eyes, median ocellus distinct and well developed (but covered by long light brownish hairs). Antenna light brown, 11-segmented (Fig. 22). Antennal club of 2 segments: segment 1 short and transverse, segment 2 considerably larger (Fig. 22). Last segment of antennal club rather circular (slightly suboval) in general shape; 4.5 times as long and 1.5 times as wide as preceding segment. Antennal fossa deeply excavate and occupies greater part of hypomeron (Fig. 21). Adjacent area of hypomeron (around antennal fossa) with stout setation. Pronotum slightly punctuated with lateral margin slightly visible from above (in anterior part near head). Scutellum triangular (acute angles), dark brown, small and poorly marked. Elytra parallel-sided, each elytron densely punctuated, those punctures larger than on pronotum. Almost all of the elytral area covered with light brownish pubescence (Fig. 20). Elytra with 2 areas of light brown cuticle — one situated under humeral calli (looks like reversed V and does not reach the suture), second one located in the lower part of elytra from half of length to apices (circular in general shape) (Fig. 20). Abdomen densely punctuated, punctures denser on 2nd to 5th visible sternite, and with sublateral distal carinae on 1st visible sternite. Pygidium as in Fig. 24. Legs covered with stout, brownish setation. Tibiae and tarsi lighter than femora and trochanters, without distinct teeth (tibial spines). Tarsus with 2 tarsal-claws. Phallus as in Figs. 25 and 26. Parameres deeply u-shaped, covered with few setae on the lateral margins as well as in the central and inner areas; the longest setae present only on apex of parameres. Distal parts of parameres curved inward above the bridge of parameres. Penis with distal end pointing up (Figs. 25 and 26); in frontal view straight (Fig. 26), in lateral slightly curved in a basal part above short apodemes and below of the apical part (Fig. 26). Apical part of penis (on top) acute (in lateral view, Fig. 26). Ninth abdominal sternite spatula-like (Fig. 27). Apex slightly elongated and rounded. Setae present on the top and lateral margins, but only in the anterior part. Abdominal sternite X as in Fig. 28. VIII abdominal sternites as illustrated in Fig. 29.

  • Differential Diagnosis

    The new species is similar to the Orphinus atrofasciatus Pic, 1916 and Orphinus notaticollis Pic, 1916, but differs from them by the following characters:

    In Orphinus atrofasciatus Pic, 1916: dark elytral transverse fascia reaching from suture to lateral part; pronotum without dark discal spot (India: Tamil Nadu); in Orphinus notaticollis Pic, 1916: dark elytral transverse fascia not reaching from suture to lateral part; pronotum with dark discal spot (south and east India); while in Orphinus kabakovi sp. nov. elytra with 2 areas of light brown cuticle — one situated under humeral calli (looks like reversed V and does not reach the suture), second one located in the lower part of elytra from half of length to apices (circular in general shape) (Fig. 20) (Afghanistan).

  • Etymology

    The epithet is a patronym honoring the collector of the beetles — O. N. Kabakov (St. Petersburg, Russia).

  • Figs. 14–19.

    Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954. 14, male antenna, left; 15, female antenna, left; 16, male genitalia; 17, male genitalia, lateral; 18, abdominal sternite IX; 19, abdominal sternite X.

    f14_1414.jpg

    Figs. 20–24.

    Orphinus (Orphinus) kabakovi sp. nov., holotype. 20, habitus, dorsal; 21, habitus, ventral; 22, left antenna; 23, abdominal sternites I–V; 24, pygidium.

    f20_1414.jpg

    Figs. 25–29.

    Orphinus (Orphinus) kabakovi sp. nov., holotype. 25, male genitalia; 26, male genitalia, lateral; 27, abdominal sternite IX; 28, abdominal sternite X; 29, abdominal sternite VIII.

    f25_1414.jpg

    Genus Ctesias Stephens, 1830

  • Ctesias (Decemctesias) kaliki Mroczkowski, 1961 (Fig. 30)

  • Material Examined

    Afganistan, Oruzgan N Sahvestan, 2,500 m, 18.7.1970, Kabakov lgt., 2 exx., (ZIN); Afganistan, Nurestan S Waygal, 1,500 m, 18.7.1972, Kabakov lgt., 1 ex. (ZIN).

  • Distribution

    Afghanistan (Háva 2007); new locality data for this country.

  • Ctesias (Decemctesias) mroczkowskii sp. nov. (Figs. 3141)

  • Type Material

    HOLOTYPE (male): AFGHANISTAN, Ghazni Ahguri 2,000 m 10 VII 1973 Kabakov lgt. [both antenna without last 2 antennomeres], (ZIN); PARATYPES: 3exx. (females): Afghanistan, Ghazni NW Mogur 3000m 23.5.1973 Kabakov lgt., (ZIN, DBEIC, JHAC) [one of them with damaged pronotum, left antenna in 2 parts, most of dorsal pubescence on pronotum and elytra in central part lack].

  • Description

    Measurements for holotype: length from anterior margin of pronotum to apex of elytron 3.65 mm; maximum width across elytra 2.1 mm; median length of pronotum 0.8 mm; maximum width of pronotum 1.9 mm; maximum length of sternites I–V 1.7 mm; maximum width of sternites I–V 1.9 mm; length of lateral margin of pronotum 0.8 mm; measurements for paratype: length from anterior margin of pronotum to apex of elytron 4.15 mm; maximum width across elytra 2.4 mm; median length of pronotum 1.0 mm; maximum width of pronotum 2.15 mm; maximum length of sternites I–V 2.15 mm; maximum width of sternites I–V 2.35 mm; length of lateral margin of pronotum 0.8 mm. Body oval and convex. Dorsal surface covered with dark brown and white setation (Fig. 31); while ventral with brownish and white (Fig. 32). Integument of pronotum black, while elytral integument dark brown to reddish (Fig. 31). Both sides of the body (dorsum and venter) with visible punctuation. Head with convex and compound eyes, covered with dark brown and short setae. Median ocellus present. Antenna of both sexes 10-segmented (Fig. 34); brown (in transparent light first antennomeres darker than the rest of segments, Figs. 33 and 34). Antennal club of 3 segments: segment 1 in male as in Fig. 33, while antennal club in female as in Figs. 34. Pronotum distinctivly convex in central part of disc; cavities along posterior margin slightly depressed. All area of pronotum with dark brown pubescence — only few white setae near posterior margin. Scutellum subtriangular, dark brown, small and poorly marked. Elytra parallel-sided, each elytron densely punctate, those punctures larger than on pronotum. Elytral area covered with dark brown and white pubescence (Fig. 31). Cuticle of elytra bicolorous — between dark brown areas 3 reddish transversal lines present (first under humeral calli, second in half of the total length of elytra, third above apices). Dark brown elytral integument covered with dark brown pubescence, while reddish areas with white pubescence. Abdomen densely punctuated, punctures denser on 2nd to 5th visible sternite. 1st visible sternite without sublateral distal carinae. Legs covered with stout, brownish setation. Tibiae and tarsi lighter than femora and trochanters, and without distinct teeth (tibial spines). Tarsus with 2 tarsal-claws. Phallus as in Figs. 35 and 36. Parameres deeply u-shaped, covered with few and short setae on the lateral margins as well as in the central and inner areas. Distal parts of parameres only slightly curved inward. Penis with distal end pointing up (Figs. 35 and 36); in frontal view straight (Fig. 35), in lateral as in Fig. 36. Apical part of penis (on top) rounded (Figs. 35 and 36). Ninth abdominal sternite as in Fig. 37. Apical part clearly separated from the rest by the narrowing. Apex elongated and rounded. Setae present on the top and lateral margins, but only in the anterior part. Abdominal sternite X as in Fig. 38. VII and VIII abdominal sternites as illustrated Fig. 39. Female genitalia as in Fig. 41. Sclerites in bursa copulatrix as in Fig. 40.

    Dimorphism. Females similar to males, but sexual dimorphism expressed in morphology of antenna: in male length of first segment in antennal club is longer than the length of preceding segments combined, while in female shorter.

  • Differential Diagnosis

    The new species differs from similar species C. kaliki Mroczkowski, 1961 and C. tschuiliensis Sokolov, 1972 by the following characters:

    In C. kaliki Mroczkowski, 1961: elytra covered by white, dark brown and yellowish setation; elytra oval; in C. tschuiliensis Sokolov, 1972: dorsal cuticle black without reddish fasciae or spots; each elytron with 3 transverse fasciae from white setation; while in C. mroczkowskii sp. nov.: elytra and pronotum covered by white and dark brown setation; elytra more parallel.

  • Etymology

    The epithet is a patronym honoring the well known specialist in Dermestidae — Prof. M. Mroczkowski (21.3.1927-6.10.2007).

  • Figs. 30–34.

    Ctesias (Decemctesias) kaliki Mroczkowski, 1961. 30, habitus, dorsal; Ctesias (Decemctesias) mroczkowskii sp. nov.. 31, habitus, dorsal (holotype); 32, habitus, ventral (holotype); 33, male antenna, left (holotype); 34, female antenna, left (paratype).

    f30_1414.jpg

    Figs. 35–41.

    Ctesias (Decemctesias) mroczkowskii sp. nov., 35, male genitalia (holotype); 36, male genitalia, lateral (holotype); 37, abdominal sternite IX (holotype); 38, abdominal sternite X (holotype); 39, abdominal sternite VII–VIII (holotype); 40, sclerites in bursa copulatrix (paratype); 41, female genitalia (paratype).

    f35_1414.jpg

    Genus Phradonoma Jacquelin du Val, 1859
    Phradonoma sp.

  • Material Examined

    Afghanistan, Oruzgan, N Sahzestan 2,500 m, 18.vii.1970, Kabakov lgt., 1 spec., M. Kadej & J. Háva det., (ZIN).

  • Remarks

    The specimen belongs to the informal “nobile — species group“. Because of a wide spectrum of variability of P. nobile the species status of this particular female must be supported and confirmed by the analysis of male morphology.

  • Discussion

    The total number of the species of Dermestidae in Afghanistan is low but we are confident that it will increase progressively. Surely, the current level of the knowledge about biodiversity of this country is strongly influenced by the uncertain political situation. Recently, representatives of 13 genera of the 62 genera established in the Dermestidae have been recognized from this country. The subfamilies of Attageninae with genus Attagenus (13 species) and Megatominae with genus Anthrenus (14 species) are the most numerous in comparison to the other subfamilies (see the list below). Nonetheless, the new records as well as newly described species allow us to believe that the future systematic study of Afghanistan's fauna will bring significant progress in determining the species richness of this country.

    List of the species of Dermestidae recorded from Afghanistan

    An asterisk (*) indicates a new record.
    Subfamily Dermestinae

    • Tribe Dermestini

      • Genus Dermestes Linnaeus, 1758

      • Subgenus Dermestes (s.str.)

      • Dermestes ater DeGeer, 1774

      • Dermestes bicolor bicolor Fabricius, 1781

      • Dermestes leechi Kalík, 1952

      • Subgenus Dermestinus Zhantiev, 1967

      • Dermestes coronatus Steven in Schönherr, 1808

      • Dermestes frischii Kugelann, 1792

      • Dermestes laniarius laniarius Illiger, 1802

      • Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, 1774

      • Dermestes undulatus Brahm, 1790

    • Subfamily Thorictinae

    • Subfamily Orphilinae

      • Tribe Orphilini

      • Genus Orphilus Erichson, 1846

      • Orphilus kabakovi sp. nov.

    • Subfamily Attageninae

      • Tribe Attagenini

      • Genus Attagenus Latreille, 1802

      • Attagenus afghanus Háva, 2000

      • Attagenus bifasciatus (Olivier, 1790)

      • Attagenus brunneus Faldermann, 1835

      • Attagenus cyphonoides Reitter, 1881

      • Attagenus fasciatus (Thunberg, 1795)

      • Attagenus gobicola Frivaldszky, 1892

      • *Attagenus indicus Kalík, 1954

      • Attagenus lobatus Rosenhauer, 1856

      • Attagenus pellio (Linnaeus, 1758)

      • Attagenus pictus Ballion, 1871

      • Attagenus suspiciosus Solsky, 1876

      • Attagenus unicolor unicolor (Brahm, 1790)

      • Attagenus unicolor simulans Solsky, 1876

    • Subfamily Megatominae

      • Tribe Anthrenini

      • Genus Anthrenus Geoffroy, 1762

      • Subgenus Anthrenodes Chobaut, 1898

      • *Anthrenus (Anthrenodes) amoenulus Reitter, 1896

      • Anthrenus distinctus Kadej & Háva, 2006

      • Anthrenus klapperichi Kadej & Háva, 2006

      • Subgenus Anthrenops Reitter, 1881

      • Anthrenus coloratus Reitter, 1881

      • Anthrenus zebra Reitter, 1889

      • Subgenus Anthrenus (s. str.)

      • Anthrenus flavipes flavipes LeConte, 1854

      • Anthrenus flavipes albopunctatus Pic, 1895

      • Anthrenus latefasciatus Reitter, 1892

      • Anthrenus lindbergi Mroczkowski, 1959

      • Anthrenus picturatus picturatus Solsky, 1876

      • Anthrenus picturatus melanoleucus Solsky, 1876

      • Anthrenus pimpinellae pimpinellae (Fabricius, 1775)

      • Anthrenus rotundulus Reitter, 1889

      • Anthrenus scrophulariae scrophulariae (Linnaeus, 1758)

      • Subgenus Florilinus Mulsant & Rey, 1868

      • Anthrenus flavidus Solsky, 1876

      • Anthrenus museorum (Linnaeus, 1761)

      • Subgenus Nathrenus Casey, 1900

      • Anthrenus verbasci (Linnaeus, 1767)

    • Tribe Megatomini

      • Genus Ctesias Stephens, 1830

      • Subgenus Decemctesias Háva, 2004

      • Ctesias kaliki Mroczkowski, 1961

    Ctesias mroczkowskii sp. nov.

  • Genus Globicornis Latreille in Cuvier, 1829

    Subgenus Pseudomesalia Ganglbauer in Bodemeyer, 1900

    Globicornis maculatus Háva, 2004

    Globicornis quadriguttatus (Reitter, 1878)

  • Genus Megatoma Herbst, 1791

    Subgenus Pseudohadrotoma Kalík, 1951

    Megatoma conspersa Solsky, 1876

  • Genus Orphinus Motschulsky, 1858

    Subgenus Orphinus (s. str.)

    Orphinus kabakovi sp. nov.

  • Genus Phradonoma Jacquelin du Val, 1859

    Phradonoma jelineki Háva, 2006

    Phradonoma nobile (Reitter, 1881)

  • Genus Reesa Beal, 1967

    Reesa vespulae (Milliron, 1939)

  • Genus Thaumaglossa Redtenbacher, 1867

    Thaumaglossa yeti Háva, 2003

  • Genus Trogoderma Dejean, 1821

    Trogoderma granarium Everts, 1898

    Trogoderma variabile Ballion, 1878

  • Acknowledgments

    This research was supported by the Internal Grant Agency (IGA no. 20124364), Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague and Department of Invertebrate Biology, Evolution and Conservation, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biological Science, University of Wrocław (project no. 1076/IBŚ/2014).

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    Jiří Háva and Marcin Kadej "Contribution to Knowledge of the Dermestidae (Coleoptera) from Afghanistan with Description of Three New Species," Florida Entomologist 97(4), 1414-1423, (1 December 2014). https://doi.org/10.1653/024.097.0416
    Published: 1 December 2014
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