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1 October 2013 Intermittence for Humans Spreading 45,000 Years Ago: From Eurasia to the Americas
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Abstract

From northeastern Eurasia to the Americas, a three-stage spread of modern humans is considered through large-scale intermittence (exploitation/ relocation). Conceptually, this work supports intermittence as a real strategy for colonization of new habitats. For the first stage, northeastern Eurasia travel, we adapt our model to archaeological dates determining the diffusion coefficient (exploitation phase) as D = 299.44 km2/yr and the velocity parameter (relocation phase) as v0 = 4.8944 km/yr. The relative phase weight (≈0.46) between both kinds of motions is consistent with a moderate biological population rate (r' ≈ 0.0046/yr). The second stage is related to population fragmentation. The last stage, reaching Alaska, corresponds essentially to relocation (v0≈ 0.75 km/yr).

© 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309
J. C. Flores "Intermittence for Humans Spreading 45,000 Years Ago: From Eurasia to the Americas," Human Biology 85(5), 789-796, (1 October 2013). https://doi.org/10.3378/027.085.0512
Received: 20 May 2013; Published: 1 October 2013
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