Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2003 PLANT REGENERATION FROM ENCAPSULATED SOMATIC EMBRYOS OF PEDUNCULATE OAK (QUERCUS ROBUR L.)
CHRISTINE PREWEIN, EVA WILHELM
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Cotyledonary Quercus robur L. somatic embryos from two cell lines were encapsulated in 4% (w/v) sodium alginate. An artificial endosperm was provided by the addition of P24 medium plus 3% (w/v) sucrose. Oak somatic embryos and oak synthetic seeds were germinated on P24 medium plus 0.1 μM indole-3-butyric acid and 0.9 μM 6-benzylaminopurine or were dehydrated prior to germination. The highest conversion rates (26%) were obtained with encapsulated somatic embryos as well as artificial endosperm-coated somatic embryos. Encapsulation improved the regeneration into oak plantlets in one of the two cell lines tested. The artificial endosperm had no additional beneficial effect on conversion frequency, but increased germination rate in one cell line tested. Significant higher conversion could be attributed to slow desiccation compared to the non-encapsulated control. Cold storage as a post-maturation treatment had no influence on the germination ability of oak synthetic seeds. Differences in the response of the cell lines with respect to conversion frequencies and timing of germination were observed. Fifty-six well-developed plantlets regenerated 12 wk after germination, and 29 plants were transferred to the greenhouse, where they have been successfully established in substrate.

CHRISTINE PREWEIN and EVA WILHELM "PLANT REGENERATION FROM ENCAPSULATED SOMATIC EMBRYOS OF PEDUNCULATE OAK (QUERCUS ROBUR L.)," In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant 39(6), 613-617, (1 November 2003). https://doi.org/10.1079/IVP2003453
Received: 4 September 2002; Accepted: 1 April 2003; Published: 1 November 2003
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
artificial seeds
forest trees
hydrogel beads
synseeds
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top