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1 May 2004 IN VITRO REGENERATION OF THE TENNESSEE CONEFLOWER (ECHINACEA TENNESSEENSIS)
Roger J. Sauve, Margaret T. Mmbaga, Suping Zhou
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Abstract

Tennessee coneflower [Echinacea tennesseensis (Beadle) Small] was regenerated from flower stalks, leaf sections from flowering plants, and hypocotyls and cotyledons from seedlings. Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at 0.54 μM and thidiazuron (TDZ) at 22.7 μM yielded the most shoots per leaf explant. NAA and 6-benzylaminopurine concentrations for optimal shoot regeneration from leaf, flower stalk, cotyledon and hypocotyl explants in MS media were 0.54 and 24.6 μM, respectively. All explant types generated shoots; however, those derived from leaves and flower stalks produced the highest number of shoots per explant and highest percentage of explants with shoots. Explants cultured on media containing high levels of NAA (5.4–27 μM) formed calluses but no adventitious shoot. Leaf explants responded to a wider range of NAA concentrations than the other explant types but shoots generated from flower stalks grew the fastest. While all cytokinins tested increased the number of shoots per explant, the number of shoots in media containing TDZ was increased by nearly threefold. Regenerated shoots from all explant types cultured on MS medium supplemented with 0.25 μM indole-3-butyric acid initiated roots within 4 wk; NAA was not effective for root induction. All vernalized plantlets developed into plants that were morphologically identical to the source material.

Roger J. Sauve, Margaret T. Mmbaga, and Suping Zhou "IN VITRO REGENERATION OF THE TENNESSEE CONEFLOWER (ECHINACEA TENNESSEENSIS)," In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant 40(3), 325-328, (1 May 2004). https://doi.org/10.1079/IVP2004530
Received: 16 June 2003; Accepted: 1 December 2003; Published: 1 May 2004
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