Translator Disclaimer
1 July 2005 COMPARATIVE ADVENTITIOUS SHOOT INDUCTION IN KENTUCKY COFFEETREE ROOT AND PETIOLE EXPLANTS TREATED WITH THIDIAZURON AND BENZYLAMINOPURINE
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Adventitious shoot induction and elongation was compared between root and petiole explants of Kentucky coffeetree (Gymnocladus dioicus L.) explants treated with a factorial combination of benzylaminopurine (BA) and thidiazuron (TDZ). Petiole explants initiated more adventitious shoots compared to root explants. Up to 83% of petiole explants initiated shoots compared to 67% of root explants. Maximal shoot induction was approximately 12 or five shoots per responding explant for petiole and root explants, respectively. For both explant types, TDZ was more effective than BA for shoot induction. There was an interaction between BA and TDZ on shoot induction in petiole explants, with the greatest percentage of explants forming shoots and the highest number of shoots initiated on the combination of 0.5 μM TDZ plus 10 μM BA and 1.0 μM TDZ plus 5 or 10 μM BA. In contrast, increasing concentrations of BA inhibited shoot initiation in root explants with and without TDZ. While BA inhibited shoot initiation in root explants, it promoted shoot initiation in petiole explants. In contrast, TDZ was equally effective at inducing shoots in root and petiole explants. This suggests that root and petiole explants of Kentucky coffeetree could be a useful model system for studying the differences in apparent mode of action between TDZ and BA on adventitious shoot initiation.

ROBERT L. GENEVE "COMPARATIVE ADVENTITIOUS SHOOT INDUCTION IN KENTUCKY COFFEETREE ROOT AND PETIOLE EXPLANTS TREATED WITH THIDIAZURON AND BENZYLAMINOPURINE," In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant 41(4), 489-493, (1 July 2005). https://doi.org/10.1079/IVP2005669
Received: 5 October 2004; Accepted: 1 March 2005; Published: 1 July 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top