Translator Disclaimer
20 March 2007 Factors affecting plantlet regeneration from in vitro cultured immature embryos and cotyledons of Prunus mume “Xue mei”
G. G. Ning, S. P. Bai, M. Z. Bao, L. Liu
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Using immature embryos and cotyledons as explants, a successful system to culture immature embryos and induce direct regeneration from cotyledons was established for Prunus mume “Xuemei”. For immature embryo culture, a high frequency of plantlet formation (89.5%) from the embryonic axis was obtained using half-strength Murashige and Skoog (1/2 MS) medium supplemented with 13.2 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 2.7 μM 1-naphthaleneacetic (NAA). Shoots formed directly from cotyledons with the embryo axis intact when explants were cultured on 1/2 MS medium containing 2.2 μM BA with different combinations of NAA (2.7, 5.4 μM) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) (0, 2.5, 5.0 μM). Better results were achieved when the embryonic axis was removed from the cotyledons and cultured on 1/2 MS medium supplement with 13.2 μM BA, 2.7 μM NAA or 2.2 μM BA, 2.2 μM thidiazuron (TDZ), and 2.7 μM NAA, respectively. Regenerated shoots were successfully rooted on 1/2 MS or Woody Plant medium (WPM) supplemented with 2.5–5.0 μM IBA. The effect of the embryonic axis, BA, and TDZ on cotyledon regeneration was investigated in detail. Rooted plantlets were transferred to soil successfully.

G. G. Ning, S. P. Bai, M. Z. Bao, and L. Liu "Factors affecting plantlet regeneration from in vitro cultured immature embryos and cotyledons of Prunus mume “Xue mei”," In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant 43(2), 95-100, (20 March 2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11627-007-9035-8
Received: 20 June 2006; Accepted: 4 October 2006; Published: 20 March 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
Cotyledons
Direct shoot regeneration
Immature Embryos
Organogenesis
Prunus mume
rooting
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top