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1 September 2012 Determinants of Farmers' Tree Planting Behaviour in the North West Region of Cameroon: the Case of Prunus africana
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Abstract

Poor households in Cameroon rely on trees and tree-based products like the bark of Prunus africana (Hook.f.) Kalman (Rosaceae) (henceforth called Prunus) that are harvested from the wild. Due to unsustainable bark harvesting practices, the European Union, which is Cameroon's main market for Prunus bark, banned its importation. To reduce pressure on existing natural stock, research and development organizations introduced innovations to encourage farmers to plant Prunus trees. The research reported in this article analyses farmer characteristics which influence their Prunus planting behaviour, and examines their main problems. Results from interviewing 154 farmers who have been trained on tree domestication techniques suggest that male farmers and those who bought their land have planted Prunus in their farms. We conclude that Prunus information and planting campaigns can be effective if they are accompanied with policies which influence better prices, supply of seeds and seedlings, and address land tenure issues.

A. Gyau, M. Chiatoh, S. Franzel, E. Asaah, and J. Donovan "Determinants of Farmers' Tree Planting Behaviour in the North West Region of Cameroon: the Case of Prunus africana," International Forestry Review 14(3), 265-274, (1 September 2012). https://doi.org/10.1505/146554812802646620
Published: 1 September 2012
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