Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2008 Comparison Between Co2 Laser and 4.0 MHz Radiosurgery for Incising Skin in White Carneau Pigeons (Columba Livia)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

To objectively evaluate the collateral damage associated with radiosurgical and carbon dioxide (CO2) laser devices, a comparative surgical and histologic study was undertaken in white Carneau pigeons (Columba livia). Ten pigeons were anesthetized, and a series of 3 skin incisions were made in the pectoral region by using a 4.0-MHz radiosurgical unit, a CO2 laser, and a scalpel blade (control). A total of 90 skin incisions were microscopically evaluated, and their associated mechanical- and thermal-induced tissue lesions were measured in micrometers. Scalpel incisions invariably resulted in hemorrhage, whereas all laser and radiosurgical skin incisions were essentially bloodless. Scalpel blade incisions were least traumatic (mean [SD] 18 ± 15 µm) followed by incisions created with radiosurgery (mean [SD] 94 ± 60 µm) and CO2 laser (mean [SD] 150 ± 64 µm). Radiosurgery was significantly less traumatic than CO2 laser (P  =  .003). Radiosurgery appears to offer significant benefits over CO2 laser for avian surgery.

Stephen Hernández-Divers, Scott J. Stahl, Tanya Cooper, and Uriel Blas-Machado "Comparison Between Co2 Laser and 4.0 MHz Radiosurgery for Incising Skin in White Carneau Pigeons (Columba Livia)," Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery 22(2), 103-107, (1 June 2008). https://doi.org/10.1647/2007-009R1.1
Published: 1 June 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
5 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top