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7 July 2021 Successful Treatment of Capture Myopathy and Satellite Transmitter Injury in an Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos)
Renata Hurtado, Leandro Egert, Allan Poltronieri Santos, Roberto Rossi do Nascimento Silva, Ingridh Nazareth Aragão do Amaral, Ralph Eric Thijl Vanstreels
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Abstract

An Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos) was found on shore 3 days after having been captured at sea by researchers. It presented very lethargic, moderately dehydrated, and in poor body condition. It was mildly hypothermic, with moderate pediculosis, and dark malodorous feces with yellow urates. The bird had a 48-g satellite transmitter attached with a backpack-style chest harness, which caused an ulcerative lesion on the interscapular area. The bird was severely anemic (packed cell volume, 18%), and plasma chemistry results were suggestive of a severe rhabdomyolysis (aspartate transaminase, 3620 U/L; creatine kinase, 100 400 U/L). We hypothesized that capture myopathy occurred because of a combination of capture stress and prolonged physical restraint by researchers, stress associated with repeated attempts by the bird to remove the satellite-transmitter harness, and a lengthy road transport to the rehabilitation center. A treatment protocol, which relied on a combination of aggressive fluid therapy, selenium, vitamins E and B12, and multivitamin supplementation, was administered after the initial physical assessment of the albatross. Isoflurane inhalation anesthesia was used to minimize stress associated with the performed medical procedures (eg, physical examination, removal of the satellite transmitter harness, blood collection, and wound management). Measures were adopted while the bird was hospitalized to reduce stress (eg, quiet and comfortable environment with visual barriers and restricting handling of the patient to experienced staff). Clinical and hematological monitoring was used to assess the patient's condition as the bird gradually recovered while hospitalized. The albatross was successfully released 28 days after the initial presentation, suggesting that the medical protocol employed in this case may be useful for the treatment of capture myopathy in albatrosses and other birds.

© 2021 by the Association of Avian Veterinarians
Renata Hurtado, Leandro Egert, Allan Poltronieri Santos, Roberto Rossi do Nascimento Silva, Ingridh Nazareth Aragão do Amaral, and Ralph Eric Thijl Vanstreels "Successful Treatment of Capture Myopathy and Satellite Transmitter Injury in an Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos)," Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery 35(2), 210-216, (7 July 2021). https://doi.org/10.1647/20-00024
Published: 7 July 2021
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KEYWORDS
Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross
Avian
Backpack harness
Capture myopathy
rhabdomyolysis
satellite tracking
seabird
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