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1 March 2006 A Hurricane Frederic–Generated Storm-Surge Deposit Exposed along a Surf-Zone Foredune Scarp on Dauphin Island, Alabama, U.S.A.
Carl R. Froede Jr.
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Abstract

Dauphin Island, Alabama, is a 22.5 km-long microtidal barrier island/barrier spit in the northern Gulf of Mexico. As a result of the geomorphic and topographic differences across the island, tropical storms and hurricanes impact it in a variety of ways. Hurricane Frederic crossed the western end of Dauphin Island on 12 September 1979. Storm waves measuring up to 4.6 m above the mean high water level washed over much of the barrier spit portion of the island. On the eastern end of the island, one or more storm surges created a well-defined stratigraphic unit that was subsequently buried and preserved by migrating quartz-sand foredunes. The size of the storm-surge deposit was limited by several factors, including the wave run-up energy and the areal extent and elevation of the foredunes. The nature and types of invertebrate faunas found within the surge-wave deposit reflect a nearshore subtidal source (i.e., inner neritic—likely less than 10-m water depth). The storm deposit provides invaluable information regarding the strength and intensity of the storm not directly attainable through atmospheric and sea-wave records and is consistent with washover fan sedimentation from other areas in the Gulf of Mexico.

Carl R. Froede Jr. "A Hurricane Frederic–Generated Storm-Surge Deposit Exposed along a Surf-Zone Foredune Scarp on Dauphin Island, Alabama, U.S.A.," Journal of Coastal Research 2006(222), 371-376, (1 March 2006). https://doi.org/10.2112/04-0174.1
Received: 25 February 2004; Accepted: 1 June 2004; Published: 1 March 2006
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Dauphin Island
Hurricane Frederic
storm-surge deposit
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