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1 February 2007 Sublethal Exposure to Methoxyfenozide-Treated Surfaces Reduces the Attractiveness and Responsiveness in Adult Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
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Abstract

The chemical communication (female attractiveness and male responsiveness) of adult oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), exposed to surfaces treated with the ecdysteroid agonist methoxyfenozide for 48 h were investigated in two laboratory wind tunnel assays. The recapture assay examined the ability of treated males to orient to a single cage of treated females, and the data gathered were mean percentage of males recaptured per treatment. The male sexual behavior assay examined some specific orientation behaviors (associated with sexual excitability) of treated males when they were given a choice of two competing pheromone sources (cages of treated females), and the data gathered were mean time males spent in upwind plume orientations and at source contact (female cage) per treatment. Data from the recapture assay suggests that exposure to methoxyfenozide impacts male responsiveness more than female attractiveness. In contrast, data from the sexual behavior assay strongly revealed that exposure to methoxyfenozide-treated surfaces does negatively impact both the ability of calling females to attract males and of aroused males to display sustained upwind flight behavior and time spent at the female cages.

Michael D. Reinke and Bruce A. Barrett "Sublethal Exposure to Methoxyfenozide-Treated Surfaces Reduces the Attractiveness and Responsiveness in Adult Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)," Journal of Economic Entomology 100(1), 72-78, (1 February 2007). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493(2007)100[72:SETMSR]2.0.CO;2
Received: 15 June 2006; Accepted: 12 October 2006; Published: 1 February 2007
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