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1 June 2008 Suitability of Pines and Other Conifers as Hosts for the Invasive Mediterranean Pine Engraver (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America
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Abstract

The invasive Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was detected in North America in 2004, and it is currently distributed in the southern Central Valley of California. It originates from the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and Asia, and it reproduces on pines (Pinus spp.). To identify potentially vulnerable native and adventive hosts in North America, no-choice host range tests were conducted in the laboratory on 22 conifer species. The beetle reproduced on four pines from its native Eurasian range—Aleppo, Canary Island, Italian stone, and Scots pines; 11 native North American pines—eastern white, grey, jack, Jeffrey, loblolly, Monterey, ponderosa, red, Sierra lodgepole, singleleaf pinyon, and sugar pines; and four native nonpines—Douglas-fir, black and white spruce, and tamarack. Among nonpines, fewer progeny developed and they were of smaller size on Douglas-fir and tamarack, but sex ratios of progeny were nearly 1:1 on all hosts. Last, beetles did not develop on white fir, incense cedar, and coast redwood. With loblolly pine, the first new adults emerged 42 d after parental females were introduced into host logs at temperatures of 20–33°C and 523.5 or 334.7 accumulated degree-days based on lower development thresholds of 13.6 or 18°C, respectively.

Jana C. Lee, Mary Louise Flint, and Steven J. Seybold "Suitability of Pines and Other Conifers as Hosts for the Invasive Mediterranean Pine Engraver (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America," Journal of Economic Entomology 101(3), 829-837, (1 June 2008). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493(2008)101[829:SOPAOC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 20 October 2007; Accepted: 6 February 2008; Published: 1 June 2008
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