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1 June 2010 Trap Type, Lure Placement, and Habitat Effects on Cerambycidae and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) Catches in the Northeastern United States
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Abstract

Semiochemical-based exotic species surveys targeting forest Coleoptera have gradually expanded in North America and elsewhere. Determining how various factors affect trap catches and increase species richness in traps is important for maximizing the efficacy of survey efforts. Studies were conducted in southern Maine and New Hampshire by using ethanol and α-pinene as lures to determine the influence of trap type, lure placement and size, and habitat type on catches of Scolytinae and Cerambycidae in coniferous forests. Three trap types (canopy malaise, intercept panel, and multiple-funnel), three lure placements/sizes (standard placement, above trap, and enlarged), and two habitat types (margins of clearcuts and shelterwood) were tested in three experiments. The three trap types performed equally well in terms of average number of species captured, but the canopy malaise caught more unique species than the other traps. In most cases, traps with lures placed above traps caught fewer beetles than lures hanging from the side of traps or with an expanded surface area. Generally, more insects were captured in shelterwood treatments versus the margins of clearcuts.

Kevin J. Dodds, Garret D. Dubois, and E. Richard Hoebeke "Trap Type, Lure Placement, and Habitat Effects on Cerambycidae and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) Catches in the Northeastern United States," Journal of Economic Entomology 103(3), 698-707, (1 June 2010). https://doi.org/10.1603/EC09395
Received: 19 November 2009; Accepted: 1 February 2010; Published: 1 June 2010
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