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13 June 2017 Chemical Degradation of TMR Multilure Dispensers for Fruit Fly Detection Weathered Under California Climatic Conditions
Roger I. Vargas, Steven K. Souder, Joseph G. Morse, Elizabeth E. Grafton-Cardwell, David R. Haviland, John N. Kabashima, Ben A. Faber, Bruce Mackey, Eddie Nkomo, Peter J. Cook, John D. Stark
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Abstract

Degradation models for multilure fruit fly trap dispensers were analyzed to determine their potential for use in large California detection programs. Solid three-component male lure TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) dispensers impregnated with DDVP (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) insecticide placed inside Jackson traps were weathered during summer (8 wk) and winter (12 wk) in five citrus-growing areas. Additionally, TMR wafers without DDVP, but with an insecticidal strip, were compared to TMR dispensers with DDVP. Weathered dispensers were sampled weekly and chemically analyzed. Percent loss of TML, the male lure for Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) Mediterranean fruit fly; ME, the male lure for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), oriental fruit fly; RK, the male lure for Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), melon fly; and DDVP was measured. Based on regression analyses for the male lures, TML degraded the fastest followed by ME. Degradation of the more chemically stable RK was discontinuous, did not fit a regression model, but followed similar seasonal patterns. There were few location differences for all three male lures and DDVP. Dispensers degraded faster during summer than winter. An asymptotic regression model provided a good fit for % loss (ME, TML, and DDVP) for summer data. Degradation of DDVP in TMR dispensers was similar to degradation of DDVP in insecticidal strips. Based on these chemical analyses and prior bioassay results with wild flies, TMR dispensers could potentially be used in place of three individual male lure traps, reducing costs of fruit fly survey programs. Use of an insecticidal tape would not require TMR dispensers without DDVP to be registered with US-EPA.

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
Roger I. Vargas, Steven K. Souder, Joseph G. Morse, Elizabeth E. Grafton-Cardwell, David R. Haviland, John N. Kabashima, Ben A. Faber, Bruce Mackey, Eddie Nkomo, Peter J. Cook, and John D. Stark "Chemical Degradation of TMR Multilure Dispensers for Fruit Fly Detection Weathered Under California Climatic Conditions," Journal of Economic Entomology 110(4), 1495-1500, (13 June 2017). https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox159
Received: 3 April 2017; Accepted: 12 May 2017; Published: 13 June 2017
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