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20 June 2017 Host-Mediated Effects of Semipersistently Transmitted Squash Vein Yellowing Virus On Sweetpotato Whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Behavior and Fitness
Deepak Shrestha, Heather J. McAuslane, Scott T. Adkins, Hugh A. Smith, Nicholas Dufault, James Colee, Susan E. Webb
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Abstract

Plant viruses may indirectly affect insect vector behavior and fitness via a shared host plant. Here, we evaluated the host-mediated effects of Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) on the behavior and fitness of its whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Middle East-Asia Minor 1, formerly biotype B. Alighting, settling, and oviposition behavioral assays were conducted on infected and mock-inoculated squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) and watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb) Matsum and Nakai] plants. Developmental time of immature stages, adult longevity, and fecundity were measured on infected and mock-inoculated squash plants. For adult longevity and fecundity, whiteflies were reared on infected and mock-inoculated squash plants to determine the effects of nymphal rearing host on the adult stage. More whiteflies alighted and remained settled on infected squash than on mock-inoculated squash 0.25, 1, 8, and 24 h after release. No such initial preference was observed on watermelon plants, but by 8 h after release, more whiteflies were found on mock-inoculated watermelon plants than on infected plants. Whiteflies laid approximately six times more eggs on mock-inoculated watermelon than on infected watermelon; however, no differences were observed on squash. Development from egg to adult emergence was 3 d shorter on infected than mock-inoculated squash plants. Females lived 25% longer and had higher fecundity on infected squash plants than on mock-inoculated plants, regardless of infection status of the rearing host. The host-mediated effects of SqVYV infection on whitefly behavior differ on two cucurbit host plants, suggesting the potential for more rapid spread of the virus within watermelon fields.

© The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
Deepak Shrestha, Heather J. McAuslane, Scott T. Adkins, Hugh A. Smith, Nicholas Dufault, James Colee, and Susan E. Webb "Host-Mediated Effects of Semipersistently Transmitted Squash Vein Yellowing Virus On Sweetpotato Whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Behavior and Fitness," Journal of Economic Entomology 110(4), 1433-1441, (20 June 2017). https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox161
Received: 20 December 2016; Accepted: 21 May 2017; Published: 20 June 2017
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