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29 June 2017 CRISPR/Cas9 Editing of the Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) CpomOR1 Gene Affects Egg Production and Viability
Stephen F. Garczynski, Jessica A. Martin, Margaret Griset, Laura S. Willett, W. Rodney Cooper, Kylie D. Swisher, Thomas R. Unruh
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Abstract

The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a major pest of pome fruit worldwide. Incorporation of semiochemicals, including the main sex pheromone (codlemone), into codling moth IPM programs has drastically reduced the amount of chemical insecticides needed to control this orchard pest. Odorant receptors located in sensory neuron membranes in the antennae are key sensors in the detection of semiochemicals and trigger downstream signaling events leading to a behavioral response. CpomOR1 is an odorant receptor belonging to the pheromone receptor subfamily in codling moth, and is a prime candidate for being a codlemone receptor based on its high expression levels in male antennae. In this study, the CpomOR1 gene was targeted using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to knockdown functional OR1 protein production to determine physiological function(s). By injecting early stage eggs, mutations were successfully introduced, including both deletions and insertions. When attempting to create stable populations of codling moth through mating of males with females containing mutations of the CpomOR1 gene, it was found that fecundity and fertility were affected, with edited females producing nonviable eggs. The role of CpomOR1 in fecundity and fertility in codling moth is unknown and will be the focus of future studies.

Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
Stephen F. Garczynski, Jessica A. Martin, Margaret Griset, Laura S. Willett, W. Rodney Cooper, Kylie D. Swisher, and Thomas R. Unruh "CRISPR/Cas9 Editing of the Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) CpomOR1 Gene Affects Egg Production and Viability," Journal of Economic Entomology 110(4), 1847-1855, (29 June 2017). https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox166
Received: 12 May 2017; Accepted: 15 May 2017; Published: 29 June 2017
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