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1 June 2000 Jasmonic Acid Induced Resistance in Grapevines to a Root and Leaf Feeder
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Abstract

We investigated the effects of induced resistance to the folivore Pacific spider mite, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae), as well as the root-feeding grape phylloxera Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch) (Homoptera: Phylloxeridae) in grapevines using exogenous applications of the natural plant inducer, jasmonic acid. Foliar jasmonic acid application at concentrations that caused no phytotoxicity significantly reduced the performance of both herbivores. There were less than half as many eggs produced by spider mites feeding on the induced leaves compared with control grapevine leaves. Induction reduced the numbers of phylloxera eggs and nymphal instars by approximately threefold and twofold, respectively, on induced compared with control grapevine roots. The negative demographic effects of jasmonic acid application appeared to be caused by changes in fecundity for the Pacific spider mite, and possibly changes in development rate and fecundity for grape phylloxera.

Amir D. Omer, Jennifer S. Thaler, Jeffrey Granett, and Richard Karban "Jasmonic Acid Induced Resistance in Grapevines to a Root and Leaf Feeder," Journal of Economic Entomology 93(3), 840-845, (1 June 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-93.3.840
Received: 30 July 1999; Accepted: 1 March 2000; Published: 1 June 2000
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