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1 April 2004 Contact and Leaf Residue Activity of Insecticides Against the Sweet Corn Pest Euxesta stigmatias (Diptera: Otitidae)
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Abstract

Damage by Euxesta stigmatias Loew larvae to sweet corn renders the ears unmarketable. This report evaluates the efficacy of insecticides labeled for armyworm control in Florida sweet corn against E. stigmatias adults. Tests were performed in controlled settings by using direct contact and dried plant residues of esfenvalerate, cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorpyrifos, methyl parathion, methomyl, and thiodicarb. Direct application of all insecticides except thiodicarb quickly killed or caused incapacitating sublethal affects (uncoordinated movement, uncontrolled twitching, and hyperextension of mouthparts and ovipositor) to >75% of the flies. Low rates (0.56 kg [AI]/ha) of chlorpyrifos and methyl parathion provided the most efficient control, killing 100 and 93%, respectively, within 2 h of direct contact. Low rates of pyrethroids induced low mortality but high sublethal effects that together immobilized nearly 100% of adults within 1 h of exposure. Mortality reached 95% within 2 h of direct contact in flies treated with high rates of pyrethroids. Methomyl killed as many as 94%, but required 24 h to reach this level after direct treatment. Residues on dipped leaves and field-treated plants of all tested insecticides except methyl parathion were less effective at killing adults compared with direct contact tests. Pyrethroid residues (particularly cyfluthrin) on field planted sweet corn induced significantly higher levels of sublethal effects (57–70%), and for a longer period of time, compared with materials in the other classes of chemistry.

Gregg S. Nuessly and Matthew G. Hentz "Contact and Leaf Residue Activity of Insecticides Against the Sweet Corn Pest Euxesta stigmatias (Diptera: Otitidae)," Journal of Economic Entomology 97(2), 496-502, (1 April 2004). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-97.2.496
Received: 17 December 2002; Accepted: 1 October 2003; Published: 1 April 2004
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