How to translate text using browser tools
1 March 2005 The Use of Gyrinids and Dytiscids for Stimulating Breast Growth in East Africa
Ruth Kutalek, Afework Kassa
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The use of whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) and predaceous diving beetles (Dytiscidae) for stimulating breast growth in East Africa is a unique traditional practice. The beetles are collected by young girls from rivers and pools and held to their nipples where the beetles “bite” in a defensive reaction. Simultaneously the beetles secrete defensive substances which are produced in special glands to discourage possible vertebrate predators. Gyrinids produce, among other substances, norsesquiterpenes. The Dytiscids also possess prothoracic defensive glands, which produce, among other substances, hormone-like steroids. Larvae of antlions (Myrmeleontidae) are similarly used in East Africa.

Ruth Kutalek and Afework Kassa "The Use of Gyrinids and Dytiscids for Stimulating Breast Growth in East Africa," Journal of Ethnobiology 25(1), 115-128, (1 March 2005). https://doi.org/10.2993/0278-0771(2005)25[115:TUOGAD]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 March 2005
KEYWORDS
defensive chemistry
Dytiscidae
ethnoentomology
gyrinidae
Myrmeleontidae
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top