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1 July 2000 NESTING ECOLOGY OF YELLOW RAILS IN SOUTHCENTRAL OREGON
Kenneth J. Popper, Mark A. Stern
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Abstract

From 1995–1998 we studied the breeding ecology of Yellow Rails (Coturnicops noveboracensis) in southcentral Oregon. We found 34 Yellow Rail nests; 26 had either hatched or failed when found, and eight were active (seven of these hatched). These nests were the first found in Oregon in 65 years and further substantiate recent findings that a small, disjunct population of breeding Yellow Rails persists west of the Rocky Mountains. Nests hatched between 8 June and 9 August with a mean clutch size of eight eggs (SD = 1.1). We measured vegetation in 1-m2 plots around each nest. Total live vegetation cover averaged 48.7% ± 10.9, and Carex simulata dominated at 26.1% ± 12.3. Other vegetative species characterizing Yellow Rail nest sites were: C. utriculata, C. vesicaria, Eleocharis palustris, Juncus balticus, and J. nevadensis. Dead or senescent vegetation from the previous year provided 49.7% cover. Water depths at active nests were 0.5–5.0 cm. A canopy of senescent vegetation or a dome of live vegetation was present above every nest, often concealing the nests from view.

Kenneth J. Popper and Mark A. Stern "NESTING ECOLOGY OF YELLOW RAILS IN SOUTHCENTRAL OREGON," Journal of Field Ornithology 71(3), 460-466, (1 July 2000). https://doi.org/10.1648/0273-8570-71.3.460
Received: 19 October 1998; Accepted: 1 March 1999; Published: 1 July 2000
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