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1 December 2010 Plasma Biochemistry and Hematology Values in Juvenile Hawksbill Turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) Undergoing Rehabilitation
Valentina Caliendo, Peter McKinney, David Robinson, Warren Baverstock, Kevin Hyland
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Abstract

The hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) is a regular inhabitant of the Arabian Gulf. Sea turtles are included in the IUCN red list, and the hawksbill is listed as critically endangered. From March 2004 to September 2010, the Dubai Turtle Rehabilitation Project received 150 sick and injured juvenile hawksbill turtles, rescued in the Arabian Gulf. Blood samples taken from the animals during convalescence and prior to release were analyzed, establishing a hematology and biochemistry reference interval for clinically healthy rehabilitated juvenile hawksbill turtles from the Arabian Gulf. Hemoglobin, packed cell volume (PCV), white blood cell count (WBC), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), uric acid, glucose, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, albumin, globulin, potassium, and sodium were evaluated. When compared to values at first presentation, clinically healthy rehabilitated turtles had significantly higher PCV (P = 0.006) and significantly lower WBC (P = 0.0001), heterophils (P = 0.005), monocytes (P = 0.04), AST (P = 0.03), and CK (P = 0.0001). There was no significant change in hemoglobi n, eosinophils, basophils, uric acid, glucose, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, albumin, globulin, potassiu m, or sodium levels between turtles at first presentation and post-rehabilitation.

Valentina Caliendo, Peter McKinney, David Robinson, Warren Baverstock, and Kevin Hyland "Plasma Biochemistry and Hematology Values in Juvenile Hawksbill Turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) Undergoing Rehabilitation," Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery 20(4), 117-121, (1 December 2010). https://doi.org/10.5818/1529-9651-20.4.117
Published: 1 December 2010
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