Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2017 Presence of West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues of American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) Vaccinated with a Killed West Nile Virus Vaccine
Christine T. Higbie, Javier G. Nevarez, Alma F. Roy, Fabio Del Piero
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

West Nile Virus (WNV) causes significant mortalities in captive-reared American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligators can amplify the virus, serve as a reservoir host, and represent a source of infection for humans. A killed WNV vaccine is commercially available for use in alligators. In 2014, a case of suspected WNV infection from an alligator farm in Louisiana revealed that tissues of previously vaccinated animals were positive for WNV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), whereas nonvaccinated animals were negative. Further testing demonstrated that the RT-PCR could detect viral RNA in the vaccine product itself. Virus isolation was negative in the tissues and the vaccine. These findings suggest that the RT-PCR detects the viral RNA from the killed vaccine in the tissues.

© 2017 Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians
Christine T. Higbie, Javier G. Nevarez, Alma F. Roy, and Fabio Del Piero "Presence of West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues of American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) Vaccinated with a Killed West Nile Virus Vaccine," Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery 27(1-2), 18-21, (1 March 2017). https://doi.org/10.5818/1529-9651-27.1-2.18
Published: 1 March 2017
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
Alligator mississippiensis
American alligator
captive-raised
reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction
vaccine
West Nile virus
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top