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16 September 2022 Attitudes of Brazilian Veterinarians Towards Anesthesia and Pain Management in Reptiles
Vanessa N. Gris, Mario A. Ferraro, Andressa F. K. T. Lima, Silvia R. G. Cortopassi, Adriano B. Carregaro
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Abstract

Veterinarians' perceptions regarding anesthetics and pain management in reptiles are understudied. We conducted an internet-based survey of Brazilian practitioners to assess their knowledge and attitudes towards the use of anesthetics, as well as recognition and treatment of pain, in reptiles. The most commonly cited anesthesia-related complications were prolonged recovery periods and respiratory depression. Difficulty in recognizing pain was the main impeding factor for providing analgesics. Tramadol (88.2%) and meloxicam (97%) were the most commonly used analgesics, and ketamine (88.2%), midazolam (88.2%), and isoflurane (94.5%) were the most common anesthetic agents. In conscious patients, the assessment of pain was performed mainly by observation of behavioral changes. Only 32.7% of the respondents considered their knowledge of anesthesia and analgesia in reptiles to be adequate. More women than men considered their knowledge to be insufficient (P < 0.0068), whereas age of the practitioner had no effect. Nevertheless, all respondents believe that reptiles can feel pain, and 82% provide analgesia to most of their patients. Understanding the criteria, choice, and timing of drug administration, as well as opinions on pain and anesthesia, provides information on the current practices and might assist in targeting areas where more research and development is needed to ensure reptile welfare.

Vanessa N. Gris, Mario A. Ferraro, Andressa F. K. T. Lima, Silvia R. G. Cortopassi, and Adriano B. Carregaro "Attitudes of Brazilian Veterinarians Towards Anesthesia and Pain Management in Reptiles," Journal of Herpetological Medicine and Surgery 32(3), 208-218, (16 September 2022). https://doi.org/10.5818/JHMS-D-21-00017
Published: 16 September 2022
JOURNAL ARTICLE
11 PAGES

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KEYWORDS
analgesia
monitoring
perception
Reptilia
survey
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