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1 March 2004 Is Coloration of Juvenile Male Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris) Female Mimicry?: An Experimental Test
Jerry F. Husak, J. Kelly McCoy, Stanley F. Fox, Troy A. Baird
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Abstract

Juvenile male Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris) have orange, dorsolateral color patterns that closely resemble those of gravid, adult females, and it has long been hypothesized that they serve as a form of female mimicry, reducing aggression from adult males. We experimentally tested this hypothesis by painting juvenile males to remove or maintain orange coloration and measuring the agonistic response of adult males but found no significant differences between treatments. These results do not support the hypothesis that orange coloration of juvenile male Collared Lizards is used as a form of female mimicry to reduce aggression from adult males.

Jerry F. Husak, J. Kelly McCoy, Stanley F. Fox, and Troy A. Baird "Is Coloration of Juvenile Male Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris) Female Mimicry?: An Experimental Test," Journal of Herpetology 38(1), 156-160, (1 March 2004). https://doi.org/10.1670/138-03N
Accepted: 1 November 2003; Published: 1 March 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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