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1 March 2005 Life-History Strategies Near the Limits of Persistence: Winter Survivorship and Spring Reproduction in the Common Side-Blotched Lizard (Uta stansburiana) in Eastern Oregon
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Abstract

Ectotherms from high latitudes experience a reduction in the length of their seasonal activity period, which may have consequences for life-history strategies. I studied winter survivorship and spring reproduction of a population of Common Side-Blotched Lizards, Uta stansburiana, in eastern Oregon. Results suggest that winter survivorship is much higher than estimates from other populations of this species; up to two-thirds of lizards survived winter. Data also suggest that one-third to one-half of females failed to reproduce in 2004. Larger females were significantly more likely to reproduce successfully. Over the course of the breeding season I found no animals that attempted to produce a second clutch despite a relatively early breeding season. Near the northern limits of their range, Uta may shift from maturing in less than one year and producing multiple clutches to requiring multiple years to mature and producing only a single clutch of eggs.

Peter A. Zani "Life-History Strategies Near the Limits of Persistence: Winter Survivorship and Spring Reproduction in the Common Side-Blotched Lizard (Uta stansburiana) in Eastern Oregon," Journal of Herpetology 39(1), 166-169, (1 March 2005). https://doi.org/10.1670/0022-1511(2005)039[0166:LSNTLO]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 November 2004; Published: 1 March 2005
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