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1 June 2006 Chorus Attendance and Site Fidelity in the Mink Frog, Rana septentrionalis: Are Males Territorial?
Catherine R. Bevier, Daniel C. Tierney, Lauren E. Henderson, Heather E. Reid
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Abstract

The Mink Frog, Rana septentrionalis, is closely related and behaviorally similar to the Green Frog, Rana clamitans, and the Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, but has a much smaller geographical range and is not as well known. We used mark-recapture and observation techniques to estimate male chorus attendance and site fidelity during the breeding season. We captured, measured, and individually marked 139 males in 2002 and 85 males in 2003. Each male's initial and subsequent positions were recorded using a Global Positioning System. About half the males were never recaptured in either year. Most of the remaining males were recaptured only four times; two males were recaptured more than 10 times. Males were recaptured from subsequent positions as far apart as 90 m and as close as 0.6 m. Males recaptured on consecutive observation nights were in positions less than 15 m apart on average. Although aggressive calling, chasing, and fighting occur when males encounter each other, there is no evidence that male Mink Frogs defend territories over prolonged periods as in Green Frogs and Bullfrogs.

Catherine R. Bevier, Daniel C. Tierney, Lauren E. Henderson, and Heather E. Reid "Chorus Attendance and Site Fidelity in the Mink Frog, Rana septentrionalis: Are Males Territorial?," Journal of Herpetology 40(2), 160-164, (1 June 2006). https://doi.org/10.1670/65-05A.1
Accepted: 1 February 2006; Published: 1 June 2006
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