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1 May 2004 The Pyrrhocoroidea (Hemiptera – Heteroptera) of the Ethiopian region
I. A. D. Robertson
Author Affiliations +

The superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea Southwood 1956 is closely related to the Lygaeoidea and the Coreoidea, and was placed by many authors as a subfamily of the Lygaeidae. It was recognized as a separate family by Amyot and Serville in 1843 under the name ‘Cecigenes’ and they divided it into two groups ‘Pyrrhocorides’ and ‘Largides’. These two names became recognized as subfamilies of the Pyrrhocoridae, the family name being established by Fieber (1861). Hussey (1929) quotes Van Duzee (1916), who established the name Euryophthalminae to replace Larginae and divided that subfamily into two tribes Euryophthalmini and Physopeltini. This nomenclature was dealt with in detail by China (1954) who established that Larginae is still the correct subfamily name. Van Duzee's tribe Euryophthalmini is confined to American genera. China (1954) states that because of their differing affinities, the Larginae being more closely related to the Lygaeidae and the Pyrrhocorinae to the Coreidae, both these subfamilies should assume family status. This change in status was followed by China and Miller (1959). Southwood (1956), following a study of the eggs of the Heteroptera, had also suggested that the families Largidae and Pyrrhocoridae together formed the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea. This view was accepted and confirmed by Schaefer (1964) following detailed morphological investigations of representatives of the Lygaeoidea, Coreoidea and Pyrrhocoroidea. Schaefer also summarised the conclusions of other workers who had undertaken comparative studies of morphological characters within the three superfamilies.

China and Miller (1959) used the following characters to typify the Pyrrhocoroidea:

  1. Abdominal trichobothria present

  2. Scutellum small, shorter than the clavus, a distinct claval commisure present

  3. Antennophores visible from above

  4. Antennae four segmented

  5. Ocelli absent

  6. Membrane of the hemelytra usually with two basal cells, from which 7 - 8 branching longitudinal veins extend to the apical margin

  7. Medium to large, brightly colored, usually phytophagous bugs

Only 13 out of the 18 genera now recognised in the Ethiopian Region can be said to be brightly colored; the other five genera being dark in general coloration. The two families are: Largidae - Sixth visible (seventh actual) ventral abdominal segment in the female cleft in the middle; Pyrrhocoridae -Sixth visible ventral abdominal segment entire in both sexes. There does not seem to be any way to key out the males of the African Largidae (Physopelta) without dissection.

Hussey (1929) lists 360 species worldwide in the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea Southwood 1956 with 77 African species, in 13 genera, the genus Dysdercus containing 15 of these species. Since then, a number of new species have been described. This catalogue is based on the literature up to 2000 and the study of material in the National Museum of Kenya (NMK), Nairobi, which includes my own collections from east Africa, mainly Tanzania. The present check-list gives 102 species in 18 genera.

The literature contains few references to the biology and ecology of the superfamily, being largely taxonomic. Only the genus Dysdercus, containing the ‘cotton stainers’ is of economic importance, and for that genus the literature is very extensive. For this reason the genus Dysdercus and the literature pertaining to it has been excluded from the present paper, except that, for completeness, it has been included in the list of species and the key to genera. Some of the other genera in the superfamily must be regarded as rare, few specimens being available in collections and in some, descriptions have been done on the basis of one or two specimens, sometimes only a single sex being known. Madagascar has been considered as being outside the scope of this work, as have the Mascarene Islands.

KEY TO THE AFRICAN GENERA

The first key to separate the African genera was by Stål (1865). The next key specifically intended for genera in the Ethiopian Region was by Villiers and Dekeyser (1951), to allow placement of their newly described genus Sicnatus. The characters used by Stål (1865) and Villiers and Dekeyser (1951) are similar. The present key has been altered from theirs only to accommodate recently described genera. It is expected to be accurate only within the Ethiopian Region. Much information has been published in recent years on the detailed structure of the male and female genitalia, differences that are particularly useful in the determination of species, and which are quite diagnostic for some genera, for example, the crossed parameres of the genus Cenaeus. So far, however, less than half the species have been adequately studied and generic keys based on these characters should wait until knowledge is more complete.

  1. 1.Sixth visible abdominal segment in the female cleft longitudinally, entire in the male. Medium to large insects (10 - 16 mm). General color red and black (Family Largidae).

  2. -Sixth visible abdominal segment entire in both sexes (Family Pyrrhocoridae).

  3. 2.Form exceedingly ant-like. Smaller insects (6 - 8 mm). General color black, or black and red. Mostly brachypterous, but macropterous individuals known.

  4. -Form not exceedingly ant like, at least not in the adult. Most genera macropterous.

  5. 3.Head strongly bent down in front of the eyes. Medium sized insects (8 - 11 mm). Brightly colored. Brachypterous.

  6. -Head not strongly bent down in front of the eyes. Various sizes and colors. Usually not brachypterous.

  7. 4.Head transversely narrowed and depressed behind the eyes. Larger insects (14 - 17 mm). General color red and black.

  8. -Head not as above, usually more or less horizontal.

  9. 5.Apex of corium acute. Larger brighter colored insects, (12 - 20 mm). General color black and red or brown. The ‘cotton stainers’. Venter usually with contrasting stripes.

  10. -Apex of corium rounded. Other characters different.

  11. 6.Apical borders of third and fourth visible sternites straight, not sinuate laterally. Rostrum very long. Large insects, (25 - 32 mm). General color reddish and black.

  12. -Apical borders of third and fourth visible sternites sinuate laterally. Usually without a very long rostrum.

  13. 7.Apex of of corium much longer than the corial-claval suture. Large slender insects, (18 - 24 mm). General color red and black.

  14. -Apex of the corium subequal to the corial-claval suture.

  15. 8.Anterior discal area of pronotum not limited laterally by a furrow. Medium to large sized insects, (10 - 23 mm). General color ochre to brownish.

  16. -Anterior discal area of pronotum limited by a clear lateral furrow, sometimes punctate, at least towards the front.

  17. 9.Anterior discal area of pronotum circumscribed by an impressed continuous furrow. Borders of pronotum convex and regularly curved at anterior and posterior angles. Body often hairy. Medium sized insects, (8 - 14 mm). General color red and black, or brownish.

  18. -Anterior and posterior discal areas of pronotum separated by a furrow, which may or may not be punctate. Borders of the pronotum more or less concave at the middle.

  19. 10.Anterior and posterior discal areas of pronotum separated by a furrow which is not punctate. Eyes sessile. Body never hairy. Insects of medium size, (7 - 14 mm). General color black, red and brownish.

  20. -Pronotum not as above. Other characters different.

  21. 11.Anterior and posterior discs of pronotum of different textures and colors separated by a row of punctures. Eyes more or less prominent, not sessile. Smaller oval insects, (7 - 14 mm). General color ochre or brownish. Some species brachypterous.

  22. -Pronotum not as above. Eyes sessile.

  23. 12.Anterior discal area of pronotum clearly limited by a deeply punctate furrow. The first segment of the rostrum thick, not longer than the head. Larger insects, (15 mm). General color black and reddish or cream.

  24. -First segment of rostrum not thick. Anterior discal area of pronotum not as above.

  25. 13.The first segment of rostrum equal to half the length of the head. Small species, (7 - 10 mm). General color black, with some red. Majority brachypterous.

  26. -First segment of rostrum not as above, sometimes exceeding the length of the head.

  27. 14.First segment of rostrum reaching the apex of the prosternum. Antennae with many bristles. Front femora swollen and the front tibiae curved. Small insects, (6 - 8 mm). General color blackish. Mostly brachypterous.

  28. -First segment of rostrum not as above. Antennae without many bristles.

  29. 15.Third segment of antennae thickened, much bulkier than the fourth. Small insects, (6 - 9 mm). General color dark brown or black. Brachypterous.

  30. -Antennae not of this form.

  31. 16.Fourth segment of antennae strongly thickened in the middle. Small insects, (6 mm). General color black. Brachypterous.

  32. -Antennae not of this form. Color not wholly black.

  33. 17.First segment of antennae longer than the second. Anterior disc of pronotum limited anteriorly and posteriorly by distinct punctures. Medium sized insects, (8 - 12 mm). General color black and orangish. Mostly brachypterous.

  34. -First segment of antennae shorter than the second. Apex of first segment of rostrum does not reach prosternum. Smallish insects, (8 mm). General color black and reddish.

FAMILY LARGIDAE

The family Largidae was established by Amyot and Serville (1843), under the name Largides, which can be regarded as a valid group name based on the generic name Largus Hahn 1831 (China 1954). It is represented in Africa only by three species in the large genus Physopelta Amyot and Serville 1843. The last generic description was by Stål (1865) and was done before all the African species had been described. Some of the detailed characters given by Stål, therefore, do not fit the African species too well. For example the description of the antennae only holds good for Physopelta festiva (Fabricius 1803).

PHYSOPELTA Amyot & Serville 1843

Type species: Physopelta erythrocephala Amyot & Serville 1843. (=Physopelta albofasciata (De Geer 1773) Designated by Distant (1903) and quoted as a logotype by (Hussey 1929)

Country of origin of type species: Java

Type depository: not known

Illustrations: see Physopelta festiva

  • Physopelta Am. & Serv.

  • Stål 1861: 195

  • Physopelta A. & S.

  • Stål 1863: 390

  • Physopelta A. & S.

  • Stål 1866: 2

  • Physopelta A. & S.

  • Stål 1870: 91 and 99

  • Physopelta Serv.

  • Walker 1873: 17

  • key

  • Physopelta Amyot & Serville

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 241

  • Physopelta Am. & Serv.

  • Breddin 1901: 175

  • Physopelta Stål

  • Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902: 165

  • Physopelta Amy. & Serv.

  • Distant 1904: 97

  • Physopelta Amyot & Serville

  • Hussey 1929: 28

  • Physopelta Amyot & Serville

  • Schmidt 1931: 45

  • KEY TO THE AFRICAN SPECIES MODIFIED FROM LESTION (1969)

    1. 1.Head plus body length more than 15 mm. Corium with a black band. Side of the abdomen red, with black lines of varying width anteriorly on each segment. Anal segment black.

    2. -Head plus body length less than 15 mm.

    3. 2.Corium with a black spot. Pronotum with the front half orange. Side of the abdomen reddish with the last two segments black. (12 - 13 mm).

    4. -Corium with a nearly complete black band. Pronotum with the frontal half pitchy-black. Side of the abdomen wholly black (10 - 12 mm).

    Physopelta analis (Signoret 1858)

    Type depository: Vienna: Naturhistoriches Museum

    Country of origin of type: Nigeria (Old Calabar)

    Distribution: Cameroon (Barombi); Gabon; Ghana (Addah); ‘Guinea’; Ivory Coast; Nigeria (Old Calabar)

    Measurements: length 12–13mm; width 4–5mm (1 male)

  • Physopelta analis Signoret 1858

  • Signoret 1858: 306

  • description

  • Odontopus analis Stål 1858

  • Stål 1858: 441

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris analis Sign.

  • Stål 1863: 391

  • Pyrrhocoris analis Sign.

  • Stål 1866: 2

  • description

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Stål 1870: 101

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Walker 1873: 17

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Reuter 1882: 28

  • Physopelta analis Signoret

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 241

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Haglund 1895: 464

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902: 172

  • Physopelta analis (Signoret)

  • Hussey 1929: 29

  • Physopelta analis Sign.

  • Blöte 1931: 99

  • Physopelta analis Signoret

  • Schmidt 1931: 46

  • Physopelta analis (Signoret 1858)

  • Leston 1969: 225

  • Physopelta analis (Signoret)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Physopelta festiva (Fabricius 1803)

    Type depository: Copenhagen: Zoologisch Museum

    Country of origin of type: Guinea. Distribution: Cameroon; Central African Republic; Congo (Brazzaville); Ghana; ‘Guinea’; Ivory Coast; Nigeria (Old Calabar); Uganda

    Measurements: average length, male 18.7 mm (7); female 19.3 mm (6)

  • Lygaeus festivus Fabricius 1803

  • Fabricius 1803: 220

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris festivus Fabr.

  • Burmeister 1835: 285

  • Physopelta festiva Fabr.

  • Stål 1868: 79

  • description

  • Physopelta festiva Fabr.

  • Stål 1870: 101.

  • Physopelta festiva Fabr.

  • Walker 1873: 17

  • description

  • Physopelta festiva Fabricius

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 242

  • Physopelta festiva Fabr.

  • Haglund 1895: 463

  • Physopelta festiva F.

  • Aulmann 1912: 120

  • illustration, description

  • Physopelta festiva (Fabricius)

  • Hussey 1929: 30

  • Physopelta festiva F.

  • Blöte 1931: 99

  • Physopelta festiva (Fabricius)

  • Villiers 1967: 370

  • Physopelta festiva

  • Leston 1969: 225

  • Physopelta festiva (Fabricius)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Physopelta melanoptera Distant 1904

    Type depository: London: Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon. Distribution - Benin (Dahomey); Cameroon; Central African Republic; Congo (Brazzaville); Ghana; Ivory Coast; Tanzania; Togo; Uganda

    Measurements: average length, male 10.6 mm (47); female 11.5 mm (43)

  • Physopelta melanoptera Distant 1904

  • Distant 1904: 61

  • description

  • Physopelta melanoptera Dist.

  • Distant 1909: 78

  • Physopelta melanoptera Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 167

  • Physopelta melanoptera Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 32

  • Physopelta melanoptera Distant

  • Villiers 1967: 370

  • Physopelta melanoptera

  • Leston 1969: 225

  • Physopelta melanoptera Distant

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Collected in Tanzania October–May. In West Africa associated with Mallotus oppositifolius (Euphorbiaceae) (Leston, 1969; Duviard, 1974).

    FAMILY PYRRHOCORIDAE

    ANTILOCHUS Stål 1863

    This is a large genus, mainly found in the Oriental and Australasian Regions. Three species are recorded from the Ethiopean region by Hussey (1929) but on examination of material in the National Museum of Kenya it was found that the third species, Antilochus violaceus Carlini 1892, is not a member of this genus at all, but definitely belongs to the genus Odontopus Laporte. An unnamed specimen of Odontopus in the NMK collection, from Somalia, matches Carlini's description very closely. Consequently, only two species of the Genus Antilochus are present in the Ethiopian Region, one is West African, the other is confined to Eastern and Southern Africa.

    Type species: Antilochus coqueberti (Fabricius 1803) quoted as type species by Distant (1904) and as a logotype by Hussey (1929)

    Country of origin of type species: India

    Type depository: not known

    Synonyms: Neaeretus Reuter 1887

    Illustrations: see Antilochus boerhaviae

  • Antilochus Stål 1863

  • Stål 1863: 393

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Stål 1866: 3 and 4

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 101 and 103

  • Odontopus De Lap.

  • Walker 1872: 174

  • Neaeretus Reuter 1887

  • Reuter 1887: 92

  • (syn. Bergroth 18947)

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 243

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Bergroth 1894a: 358

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Breddin 1901: 175

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902: 166

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Distant 1904: 100

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 36

  • Antilochus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 236

  • The two species of Antilochus can easily be separated by the very different appearance of the pronotum and elytra:

    1. 1.Pronotum black, surrounded by a continuous narrow yellow band. Elytra black with irregular narrow yellowish bands that appear to enclose a large irregular black spot. Sides of the thorax predominantly black. Sides of the abdomen red, with narrow whitish lines anteriorly on each segment. The whitish lines vary in thickness and there may be some black coloration towards the rear of the abdomen. Anal segment, red.

    2. 2.Pronotum black, the borders reddish-orange with the red color being wider at the posterior corners. The elytra black with reddish patches separated to leave a central area in the form of a black cross. The pattern is rather variable, but distinctly different from Antilochus boerhaviae. Sides of the thorax reddish, sometimes darker. Sides of the abdomen red with whitish lines on the anterior of each segment, which vary somewhat in thickness. No black coloring is present. Anal segment, red.

    Antilochus boerhaviae (Fabricius 1794)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: ‘Guinea’

    Distribution: British East Africa; Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Gabon; ‘Guinea’; Nigeria; Senegal; Sudan

    Synonyms: Antilochus submaculatus Kirkby 1896

    Measurements: length, male 15.5 mm (1); female 18.2 mm (1)

  • Lygaeus boerhaviae Fabricius 1794

  • Fabricius 1794: 152

  • Lygaeus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Fabricius 1803: 220

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Stål 1866: 4

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Stål 1868: 81

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Stål 1870: 104

  • Odontopus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Walker 1872: 176

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 343

  • Antilochus boerhaviae (F.)

  • Karsch 1894: 106

  • Antilochus submaculatus

  • Kirby 1896 Kirby 1896: 268

  • (syn. Distant 190237)

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Distant 1902b: 36

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabr.

  • Distant 1902b: 36

  • Antilochus boerhaviae (Fabr.)

  • Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902: 172

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Courteaux 1922: 285

  • Antilochus boerhaviae (Fabricius)

  • Hussey 1929: 37

  • Antilochus boerhaviae F.

  • Blöte 1931: 102

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Schmidt 1932: 240

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Antilochus boerhaviae Fabricius

  • Linnavuori 1978: 7

  • Antilochus boerhaviae (Fabricius)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • The illustration given by Kirby (1896) of the specimen he described as Antilochus submaculatus is not the same as a typical specimen of A. boerhaviae, with which it was synonymised by Distant (1902)37, but may be an extreme form.

    Antilochus nigrocruciatus (Stål 1855119)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: South Africa (Natal, Caffraria)

    Distribution: Kenya; South Africa (Natal, Caffraria)

    Measurements: average length, male 14.5 mm (21); female 16.6 mm (23)

  • Odontopus nigrocruciatus Stål 1855119

  • Stål 1855a: 35

  • Antilochus nigro-cruciatus Stål

  • Stål 1863: 395

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Stål 1866: 5

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 104

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus (Fabr.)

  • Walker 1872: 176

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 243

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Bergroth 1920: 17

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 40

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Blöte 1931: 104

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 240

  • Antilochus nigrocruciatus St.

  • Mancini 1961: 31

  • CALLIBAPHUS Stål 1868

    The genus Callibaphus (Stål 1868) is confined to the Ethiopian Region and only three species have been described. These insects are very large and are rare in collections. Distribution is very much West African in published papers, reaching as far east as Uganda. Bergroth (1906) described a third species Callibaphus gigas from the Comoro Islands which are outside the Ethiopean Region, but it is included because Bergroth himself indicated that he thought his specimen to be conspecific with Callibaphus longirostris (Drury 1782). C. gigas has never formally been synonymised, probably because of the great gap between its location and those of all the other published records. The type would have to be examined before a decision could be reached.

    Type species: Callibaphus longirostris (Drury 1782). Quoted as a monotype by Hussey 1929

    Country of origin of type species: Sierra Leone

    Type depository: London: Natural History Museum

    Illustrations: see Callibaphus longirostris

  • Roscius (Callibaphus)

  • Stål 1868 Stål 1868: 82

  • description

  • Callibaphus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 108

  • Callibaphus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Callibaphus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 50

  • Callibaphus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 246

  • The two African species may be separated quite easily, although the black markings both species bear on the pronotum and elytra are quite similar and are not useful as characters for separating the species:

    1. 1.Head dark red with a longitudinal black mark between and behind the eyes. Color above dark red, dull, with little variation among the available specimens. Membrane translucent. Sides of the thorax black, with dark red stripes at the rear of each segment. Sides of the abdomen dark red with black bands of varying width at the anterior of each segment, the black becoming dominant on the last two segments. Color changes diffuse. Anal segment dark red.

    2. 2.Head orange to red without any black markings. Color above bright orange to red. Membrane black. Sides of thorax and abdomen black, with yellow lines of varying width at the rear of each segment. Color changes sharply defined. Anal segment orange to red.

    Callibaphus albipennis Distant 191443

    Type depository: London: Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Kenya; Uganda

    Measurements: length, male 26.9 mm(1); female 31.7 mm (1)

  • Callibaphus albipennis Distant 191443

  • Distant 191443: 180

  • description

  • Callibaphus albipennis Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 51

  • Callibaphus longirostris (Drury 1782)

    Type depository London: Natural History Museum.

    Country of origin of type: Sierra Leone.

    Distribution: Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); (probably) Comoro Islands; Guinea; Nigeria; Sierra Leone; Tanzania; Togo.

    Synonyms: Roscius fasciatus Walker 1872; Callibaphus gigas Bergroth 1906 (probably)

    Measurements: length, male 30.1 mm (1)

  • Cimex longirostris Drury 1782

  • Drury 1782: 60

  • description, illustration

  • Lygaeus guineensis Fabricius 1803

  • Fabricius 1803: 216

  • description (syn. Stål 1868)

  • Roscius (Callabaphis) longirostris Drury

  • Stål 1868: 83

  • description

  • Cimex longirostris Drury

  • Stål 1870: 108

  • Roscius longirostris Drury

  • Walker 1872: 173

  • description

  • Roscius fasciatus Walker 1872

  • Walker 1872: 174

  • (syn. Leth. & Serv. 1894)

  • Callibaphus longirostris Drury

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Callibaphus longirostris Dru.

  • Distant 1902b: 37

  • Callibaphus longirostrus (Drury)

  • Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902: 172

  • Callibaphus gigas Bergroth 1906

  • Bergroth 1906: 199

  • description

  • Callibaphus gigas Bergr.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Callibaphus gigas Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 51

  • Callibaphus longirostris (Drury)

  • Hussey 1929: 51

  • Callibaphus longirostris Drury

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Callibaphus longirostris Drury

  • Schmidt 1932: 246

  • Callibaphus longirostris Drury

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Callibaphus longirostris (Drury)

  • Villiers 1967: 371

  • Callibaphus longirostris (Drury)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Earlier data indicate that this species is confined to West Africa, Cameroon and Congo (Brazzaville). Bergroth (1906) described C. gigas from the Comoro Islands and indicated that it seemed very likely to be a variety of C. longirostris. A record from Tanzania in the National Museum of Kenya provides a possible link between the very widely separated populations in West Africa and the Comoro Islands.

    ROSCIUS Stål 1866

    The genus Roscius is confined to the Ethiopian region and five species have been described. The genus is characterized by the fact that the apical border of the corium is much longer than the commisure of the corium-clavus. This character reflects the slender elongate shape of all the species in the genus.

    Type species: Roscius elongatus (Schaum 1853)

    Country of origin of type species: Mozambique

    Type depository: not known

    Illustrations: see Roscius circumdatus and Roscius illustris

  • Roscius Stål

  • Stål 1870: 102

  • Roscius Stål

  • Walker 1872: 173

  • Roscius Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Roscius Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 51

  • Roscius Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 246

  • Five species are described in the published literature, although the status of Roscius elongatus and Roscius quadriplagiatus, both originally described by Schaum in 1853, is doubtful. As no authentic specimen of Roscius elongatus (Schaum 1853) is available it has been left out of the key below.

    1. 1.Head red without any black markings. Front half of the pronotum raised, black, separated from the rear half by a marked impressed furrow which curves backwards to the sides. The front half of the pronotum having no yellow, or having only a very narrow line of yellow on the anterior edge, which may be reduced to two yellow lateral anterior spots. The elytra with the anterior yellow marking sub-triangular, not an irregular shape. Sides of the abdomen with the first two visible segments markedly yellow or pale, the next two almost wholly black. Anal segment red.

    2. -Head red, but having at least some black markings between and behind the eyes

    3. 2.Pronotum wholly surrounded by a narrow yellow border. The elytra with narrow elongate yellowish markings, the rear pair forming a border between the corium and the membrane.

    4. -Pronotum not as above. Markings on the elytra and the sides of the abdomen different.

    5. 3.Pronotum flattened, with a marked wide orange anterior border and wide lateral orange borders. At most a very narrow band of orange posteriorly. The elytra with the anterior orange spots not triangular, but elongate and irregular, reaching to the shoulder. Sides of the abdomen much like Roscius illustris, but the first two visible segments red, with black coloration towards the connexivium, the next two segments almost wholly black. Anal segment red.

    6. -Pronotum raised and divided by a curved furrow, but the yellow markings usually form a border on all four sides, narrowest and sometimes missing on the anterior half, laterally. Always with a yellow anterior border. The yellow markings being broadest at the posterior lateral corners. The elytra with the anterior yellow markings not triangular, irregular and extending forwards to the shoulder. Sides of the abdomen red, with black lines anteriorly on each segment. The width of the black varies, but the stripes are widest on the third and fourth visible abdominal segments. Anal segment red.

    Roscius elongatus (Schaum 1853)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Mozambique

    Distribution: Angola; Congo (Brazzaville); Gabon; Mozambique; Tanzania; Zanzibar

    Measurements: length 24 mm, width 8 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Pyrrhocoris elongatus Schaum 1853

  • Schaum1853: 358

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris elongatus Schaum

  • Schaum 1862: 46

  • description

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Stål 1866: 8

  • description

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Stål 1870: 109

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Walker 1872: 173

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Gerstäcker 1892: 50

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Bergroth 1893: 126

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Montandon 1899

  • Roscius elongatus (Schaum)

  • Hussey 1929: 51

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Schmidt 1932: 247

  • Roscius elongatus Schaum

  • Villiers 1967: 372

  • This species is widely distributed in southern and eastern Africa. It seems to be very closely related to Roscius quadriplagiatus (Schaum 1853) according to the written descriptions (Schaum 1853, repeated in 1862): Pyrrhocoris quadriplagiatus Schaum; Supra niger, capite thoracisque marginibus rufus, elytrorum maculis duabus flavis, subtus rufus, pectoris lateribus antennis pedibusque nigris. Long 8 lin (= 16.8 mm). Pyrrhocoris elongatus Schaum; Supra niger, epistomate, thoracis margine antico et postico, elytrorum maculis duabus rufis, anteriori sublunata, subtus rufus, pectoris lateribus pedibusque nigris. Long 10 lin (= 21.0 mm).

    Roscius guilielmi Bergroth 1926

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Guinea; Uganda

    Measurements: length, male 17.0 mm (1); female 20.0 mm (1)

  • Roscius guilielmi

  • Bergroth 1926 Bergroth 1926: 11

  • description

  • Roscius guilielmi Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 52

  • Roscius guilielmi Bergroth

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Roscius guilielmi Bergroth

  • Villiers 1967: 372

  • This spceies has a West African distribution, and specimens in the NMK collection from western Uganda probably reflect the eastern limit of its range.

    Roscius illustris Gerstäcker 1873

    Type depository: Berlin Museum

    Country of origin of type: Kenya

    Distribution: Kenya; Mozambique; Tanzania; Zanzibar

    Measurements: average length, male 14.4 mm (6), female 18.3 mm (7)

  • Roscius illustris

  • Gerstäcker 1873 Gerstäcker 1873: 414

  • description, illustration

  • Roscius illustris Gerst.

  • Gerstäcker 1892: 50

  • Roscius illustris Gerstaecker

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Roscius illustris Gerstäcker

  • Hussey 1929: 52

  • Roscius illustris Gerst.

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Roscius illustris Gerstäcker

  • Schmidt 1932: 247

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus (Schaum 1853)

    Type depository: Berlin Museum

    Country of origin of type: Mozambique

    Distribution: Gabon; Kenya; Mozambique; Tanzania

    Measurements: average length, male 16.6 mm (8), female 21.8 mm (5)

  • Pyrrhocoris quadriplagiatus Schaum 1853

  • Schaum 1853: 358

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Schaum 1862: 45

  • description

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Stål 1870: 108

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Walker 1872: 173

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Hussey 1929: 52

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Schmidt 1932: 247

  • In the published literature this species is recorded from Mozambique and Gabon, but specimens in the NMK collection extend the range. The written descriptions of Roscius elongatus (Schaum 1853) and Roscius quadriplagiatus (Schaum 1853), as given above, make it doubtful if this species is different from Roscius elongatus (Schaum 1853)

    Roscius circumdatus Distant 1881

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Nigeria (Calabar)

    Distribution: Nigeria (Calabar); Cameroon; Ivory Coast; Democratic Republic of Congo

    Synonyms: Antilochus arcifer Bergroth 1920

    Measurements: length 19 mm (ex. Lit.).

  • Roscius quadriplagiatus Schaum

  • Walker 1872: 173

  • description

  • Roscius circumdatus Distant 1881

  • Distant 1881: 275

  • description, illustration

  • Roscius circumdatus Distant

  • Haglund 1895: 465

  • Roscius circumdatus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1920: 3

  • description

  • Antilochus arcifer Bergroth 1920

  • Bergroth 1920: 3

  • (syn. Schmidt 1932)

  • Antilochus arcifer Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 36

  • Roscius circumdatus Distant

  • Schmidt 1932: 247

  • description

  • Roscius circumdatus Distant

  • Linnavuori 1988: 16

  • ODONTOPUS Laporte 1832

    Hussey (1929) listed fifteen species in this genus, of which only six occurred in the Ethiopian Region. Since Hussey's catalogue was published two more species and one new variety have been described from the Ethiopian Region. All the members of the genus have a very similar appearance and all seem to be associated with the plant families Sterculiaceae and Malvaceae.

    In 1904 Kirkaldy proposed the name Probergrothius for this genus as a replacement for Odontopus Laporte 1832, on the grounds that the name was preoccupied by a genus of Coleoptera, described by Siebermann. The details of priority had already been established by Alluaud (1889) fifteen years before Kirkaldy made his proposal. Kirkaldy himself realised that the name Odontopus was not validly preoccupied (Kirkaldy 1905), and this view was supported by Distant (1919). Only Hesse (1925) accepted the new name. However, Stehlik (1966) renewed the claim that Odontopus Laporte 1832 is preoccupied by a genus of Coleoptera described under the name Odontopus by Say (1831). Stehlik therefore proposes that the name Probergrothius Kirkaldy 1904 be reinstated for the Ethiopian and Oriental species in the genus (the Madagascaran species having been transferred to a new genus). In this work, the name Odontopus is retained in the hope that the renaming of this large genus will be referred to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature for their consideration.

    Type species: Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte 1832. Quoted as a monotype by Hussey 1929

    Country of origin of type species: Senegal

    Type depository: not known.

    Synonyms: Probergrothius Kirkaldy 1904

    Illustrations: see Odontopus notabilis Distant 190237, Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte 1832

  • Odontopus Laporte 1832

  • Laporte 1832: 37

  • description

  • Odontopus Lap.

  • Amyot and Serville 1843: 270

  • description

  • Odontopus

  • Herrich-Schaffer 1853: 174

  • description

  • Odontopus Lap.

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • Odontopus Lap.

  • Stål 1866: 3

  • description

  • Odontopus Lap.

  • Stål 1870: 102

  • description

  • Odontopus Laporte

  • Alluaud 1889: LXV

  • Odontopus de Castelnau

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 246

  • Odontopus Laporte

  • Distant 1903: 108

  • description

  • Probergrothius Kirkaldy 1904

  • Kirkaldy 1904: 280

  • (syn Distant 1919)

  • Odontopus

  • Kirkaldy 1905: 79

  • Odontopus Laporte

  • Distant 1919: 2

  • KEY TO THE AFRICAN SPECIES

    Odontopus angolensis Distant 190237 and Odontopus obscurellus Blöte 193321, which is only known from Zimbabwe, are not included because I have not seen specimens.

    1. 1.Larger species (16 - 23 mm) with one pair of large black rounded spots posteriorly on the elytra. (A variety, O. notabilis var. kambovensis lacks the black spots). Body mainly unicolorous, ochraceus. Antennae with the first segment red and the other three segments dark. Pronotum with the frontal part limited by two fairly deeply impressed black lines. Scutellum black. Thorax with the sterna black. Abdomen with the incisures marked with narrow blackish lines.

    2. -Elytra not showing this pattern. Pronotum and other body parts different.

    3. 2.Large species (16.0 mm) with the elytra having one pair of round black spots posteriorly and a pair of black bands anteriorly. Head whitish. Pronotum with the frontal area whitish. Scutellum the same color as the elytra. Membrane milky. Thorax with the sterna whitish. Sides of the abdomen whitish ventrally, but darkening in the dorsal half.

    4. -Elytra not having this pattern. Body colors different.

    5. 3.Species with not more than two pairs of small spots on the elytra. Sometimes the anterior pair are very small or missing.

    6. -Species with three pairs of spots on the elytra, sometimes the two anterior pairs are partially joined.

    7. 4.Species (14 - 20 mm) markedly unicolorous, ochraceus, without red legs. At most narrow reddish stripes marking the abdominal incisures. Head quite pale, ochraceus. Frontal area of the pronotum limited by two dark lines. Last two segments of the antennae dark.

    8. -Species with red legs and generally much brighter coloring than the above.

    9. 5.Species (16 mm) with the central lobe of the head having a longitudinal black stripe running the whole length of the head. Head, other than the central black longitudinal stripe, orange. Pronotum with a pale anterior collar, the frontal area orange, limited by two distinct black lines. Scutellum orange. Membrane darker than the elytra. Antennae dark red, getting darker towards the tip. Legs red. Thorax with the sterna reddish with dark borders, sometimes all darker. Sides of the abdomen reddish, with wide blackish bands of variable width at the anterior of each segment.

    10. -Species (14 - 17 mm) with the central lobe of the head with a red longitudinal stripe running the whole length of the head. Head, other than the central red longitudinal stripe, ochraceus. Pronotum with a pale anterior collar and the frontal area ochraceus, sometimes darker shaded, bounded by two marked black lines. Antennae red, third and fourth segments darker. Legs reddish. Thorax with the sterna dark reddish. Membrane much the same color as the elytra. Sides of the abdomen yellowish, with broad but regular black stripes anteriorly on each segment.

    11. 6.Species (14 - 21 mm) occurring in two color forms, red and black, but in both cases the elytra with two pairs of smallish spots anteriorly (rather larger and partially joined together in the black form) and a single pair of larger spots posteriorly.

    12. -Species (15 - 18 mm) with two pairs of small separate black spots anteriorly on the elytra. A single pair of small black spots posteriorly.

    Odontopus angolensis 190237

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Angola

    Distribution: Angola; Cameroon; Democratic Republic of Congo; Namibia; Zambia

    Measurements: length 18 - 21 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Odontopus angolensis Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 38

  • description

  • Odontopus angolensis Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Odontopus angolensis Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 52

  • Odontopus angolensis Dist.

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Odontopus angolensis Distant

  • Schmidt 1932: 249

  • Odontopus confusus Distant 190237

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Eritrea; Tanzania; Zanzibar

    Measurements: average length, male 14.5 mm (17), female 17.6 mm (19)

  • Odontopus confusus Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 39

  • description

  • Odontopus confusus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Odontopus confusus Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 52

  • Odontopus confusus Dist.

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Odontopus confusus Distant

  • Schmidt 1932: 249

  • Breeding on or in association with Sterculia appendiculata, Sterculia quinqueloba, Sterculia africana, Adansonia digitata (Baobab) and Ceiba pentandra (Kapok). Also a few in association with cotton, dolichos, castor, cassava, pigeonpea, Sida sp.and Calotropis procera, although none of these need be considered as important hosts. At Ukiriguru (Tanzania) batches of eggs were laid by caged pairs and averaged 28 eggs (24–36) per batch.

    Odontopus exsanguis (Gerstäcker 1892)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Zanzibar

    Distribution: Tanzania; Zanzibar. Synonyms: Odontopus schoutedeni Bergroth 1903

    Measurements: average length, male 13.8 mm (15), female 15.8 mm (16)

  • Cenaeus exsanguis Gerstäcker 1892

  • Gerstäcker 1892:50

  • description

  • Odontopus schoutedeni Bergroth 1903

  • Bergroth 1903: 290

  • description (syn. Distant 1919)

  • Odontopus schoutedeni Berg.

  • Bergroth 1906: 371

  • Cenaeus exsanguis Gerst.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Odontopus confusus Distant

  • Distant 1919: 219

  • Odontopus exsanguis (Gerstäcker)

  • Hussey 1929: 53

  • Odontopus exsanguis Gerstäcker

  • Schmidt 1932: 249

  • Most specimens are recorded as having been collected on Sterculia sp.

    Odontopus modestus Distant 190237

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Kenya

    Distribution: Ethiopia; Kenya; Somalia

    Measurements: average length, male 15.7 mm (14), female 19.0 mm (20)

  • Odontopus modestus Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 38

  • description

  • Odontopus modestus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1903: 291

  • Odontopus modestus Dist.

  • Schouteden 1905: 1

  • Odontopus modestus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 170

  • Odontopus modestus Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 53

  • Probergrothius modestus (Distant 190237)

  • Linnavuori 1986: 109

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant 190237

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Angola; Burundi; Democratic Republic of Congo; Uganda; Tanzania

    Synonyms: Odontopus aulmanni Aulmann 1912

    Measurements: average length, male 16.2 mm (6), female 19.1 mm (6)

  • Odontopus notalilis Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902a: 42

  • description, illustration

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant

  • Bergroth 1903: 291

  • description

  • Odontopus aulmanni Schumacher

  • Schumacher 1912: 121

  • description, illustration, (syn. Bergroth 191314)

  • Odontopus notabilis Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 170

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 54

  • Odontopus notabilis Dist.

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant

  • Goursat 1931b: 266

  • description, illustration

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant

  • Schmidt 1932: 249

  • Odontopus notabilis Distant 190237 var. kambovensis Goursat 193162

    This variety of O. notabilis was described by Goursat 193162 from a specimen originating in Kambove (Democratic Republic of Congo, Shaba). The main difference between it and the nominate form is that it lacks the distinct rounded black spot at the apex of the corium. This variety is well represented in the National Museums of Kenya collection and the specimens come from two of the same localities in western Tanzania as did the nominate species, obviously part of the same collections.

    Measurements: average length, male 16.7 mm (8), female 21.0 mm (5)

    Odontopus obscurellus Blöte 193321

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Zimbabwe

    Distribution: Zimbabwe

    Measurements : length of male 10.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Odontopus obscurellus Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933b: 592.

  • description

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte 1832

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Senegal

    Distribution: Angola; Burkino Fassa; Chad; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Eritrea; Ethiopia; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Mozambique; Namibia; Nigeria; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Africa; Sudan; Tanzania

    Measurements: Red form, average length, male 15.1 mm (5), female 18.7 mm (6). Black form, average length, male 17.3 mm (2), female 16.9 mm (5)

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte 1832

  • Laporte 1832: 37

  • description, illustration

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Spinola 1837: 178

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Amyot and Serville 1843: 271

  • description

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Guerin-Meneville 1849: 341

  • illustration

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Herrich-Schaffer 1850: 178

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte

  • Schaum 1862: 44

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Stål 1863: 392

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Stål 1866126: 6

  • description

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Stål 1870: 109

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus de Lap.

  • Walker 1872: 175

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Bergroth 1893: 126

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus de Castelnau

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 246

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus (Lap.)

  • Distant 1900: 48

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Bergroth 1913b: 239

  • Probergrothius sexpunctatus de Castelnau

  • Hesse 1925: 86

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte

  • Hussey 1929: 55

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte

  • Schmidt 1932: 248

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Castelnau

  • Villiers 1950a: 323

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Lap.

  • Risbec 1951: 248

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte

  • Schouteden 1957: 263

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus Laporte

  • Villiers 1967: 372

  • Odontopus sexpunctatus (Lp.)

  • Linnavuori 1978: 7

  • Probergrothius sexpunctatus (Laporte de Castelnau)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 16

  • This species is very widespread in the Ethiopian Region. There are two distinct forms, one with a blackish appearance, the other being reddish, although in both the spots on the corium are black. The reddish form is the one originally described by Laporte de Castelnau in 1832, from Senegal, and his illustration (Plate IX, Figs. 5 and 5a) shows two separate spots near the base of each corium; in this form the anterior area of the pronotum is red. It is also illustrated by Stehlik 1966b (Plates III and IV). The other form, illustrated in Guerin-Meneville (1847–51, Plate 6, Fig. 6) and referred to in the caption as Astemma percheroni, shows the two basal spots on the corium coalesced into a single transverse spot, retaining the single spot near the apex of the corium. In this form the anterior area of the pronotum is black. The NMK collection has specimens of the black form from Kenya, Sudan and Uganda and the red form from Tanzania.

    Odontopus somaliensis Goursat 193162

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Somalia

    Distribution: Somalia

    Measurements: male, length 15 mm, width 6 mm; female, length 18 mm, width 7 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Odontopus somaliensis Goursat 193162

  • Goursat 1931a: 167

  • description

  • Odontopus somaliensis Goursat

  • Mancini 1954: 166

  • Antilochus violaceus Carlini 1982

    Type depository: Natural History Museum, Genoa

    Country of origin of type: Somalia

    Distribution: Somalia

    Measurements: length 16 mm; width 6 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Antilochus violaceus Carlini 1982

  • Carlini 1892: 532

  • description

  • Antilochus violaceus Carlini

  • Lethierry & Severin 1894: 243

  • Antilochus violaceus Carlini

  • Hussey 1929: 41

  • SERICOCORIS Karsch 1892

    This genus, first described by Karsch (1892) and based on hairy insects collected in Cameroon, was revised by Stehlik in 1965. Stehlik's treatment of the genus concentrated on the use of the details of the male and female genitalia to determine species and this represented a major advance in the knowledge of the taxonomy of the superfamily.

    Hussey 1929 listed only two species in the genus, but following Stehlik 1965a the number now stands at fourteen. Only one of these is a new species, Sericocoris obuduanus Linnavuori 1988. The rest have been transferred, by Stehlik 1965a, from other genera on the basis of detailed study of the genitalia. The genus is confined to the Ethiopian Region and the species are mostly rare in collections. Little is recorded in the published literature about the ecology of the species, although from the distribution and localities in which they have been found, they are most likely to be associated with forest habitats. Five of the fourteen species in the genus have been recorded as occurring in Eastern Africa, including Rwanda; the rest are West African, with Democratic Republic of Congo being the most easterly country.

    In a large genus such as this, when many species are not available for study, the older written published descriptions have been found to be inadequate. The problem is mainly that authors have not followed a standard pattern of description and one is often left wondering about what has been left out. This lack is emphasized by the detailed and well illustrated paper of Stehlik 1965a.

    Type species: Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch 1892. Quoted as a monotype by Hussey 1929

    Country of origin of type species: Cameroon

    Type depository: not known

    Synonyms: Hathor Kirkaldy and Edwards 1902

  • Sericocoris Karsch 1892

  • Karsch 1892: 132

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Karsch 1894: 106

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Bergroth 191212: 316

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Distant 1919: 220

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Hussey 1929: 50

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Schmidt 1932: 245

  • Sericocoris Karsch

  • Stehlik 1965a: 220

  • Stehlik divided the genus into three subgenera depending on the degree of hairiness of the species:

    Sericocoris, hairy

    Sericocoriopsis, dorsal surface of the body almost hairless, but some pubescence on the ventral surface. This character seems quite variable.

    Pseudocenaeus, hairless. This subgenus contains species that are smaller and more slender than the two subgenera noted above.

    Sericocoris (Sericocoris) acromelanthes Karsch 1892

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Guinea; Ivory Coast; Togo; Uganda

    Synonyms: Hathor zoraida Kirkaldy & Edwards 1902, Sericocoris cosmohymen Strand 1910

    Measurements: average length, male 10.2 mm (2), female 13.2 mm (2)

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch 1892

  • Karsch 1892: 133

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 245

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Karsch 1894: 106

  • Sericocoris cosmohymen Strand 1910

  • Strand 1910: 151

  • illustration, (syn. Bergroth 191314)

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Schumacher 1912: 319

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Bergroth 1913a: 169

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Hussey 1929: 50

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Blöte 1931: 108

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Schmidt 1932: 245

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Villiers 1950b: 640

  • illustration

  • Var. unifasciata Villiers 1950141

  • Var. nigrithorax Villiers 1950>141

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoris) acromelanthes Karsch

  • Stehlik 1965a: 222

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Villiers 1967: 371

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoris) cuneatus Villiers 1951

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Congo (Brazzaville)

    Distribution: Congo (Brazzaville)

    Measurements: length 12 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Sericocoris cuneatus Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 145

  • description, illustration

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoris) cuneatus Villiers

  • Stehlik 1965a: 222

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) johnstoni (Distant 190237)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Nigeria; Rwanda; Uganda

    Synonyms: Sericocoris acromelanthes Haglund 1895, Sericocoris acromelanthes var. nigricornis Schouteden 1957

    Measurements: average length, female 13.2 mm (3)

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Haglund 1895: 464

  • description

  • Sericocoris johnstoni Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902a: 43

  • description

  • Sericocoris acromelanthes Karsch

  • Schouteden 1957: 262

  • description

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) johnstoni Distant

  • Stehlik 1965a: 223

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris johnstoni Distant

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) dispar (Schouteden 1957)

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Rwanda

    Distribution: Rwanda

    Measurements: length, 10 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus dispar Schouteden 1957

  • Schouteden 1957: 265

  • description

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) dispar (Schouteden)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 223

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) sanguinolentus (Haglund 1895)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon

    Synonyms: Sericocoris sanguineus Villiers 1951

    Measurements : length 8.5 - 11 mm, width 3 - 4 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus sanguinolentus Haglund 1895

  • Haglund 1895: 465

  • Cenaeus sanguinolentus Hagl.

  • Schumacher 1912: 319

  • Cenaeus sanguinolentus Hagl.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus sanguinolentus Haglund

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Sericocoris sanguineus Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 146

  • illustration (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Sericocoris (Sericocoriopsis) sanguinolentus (Haglund)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 146

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) nigriceps (Stål 1855)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: South Africa

    Distribution: Kenya; Rwanda; Soth Africa; Sudan; Tanzania

    Synonyms: Dindymus natalensis Distant 190237, Cenaeus kilimanus Schouteden 1910, Cenaeus usambarae Schouteden 1910, Cenaeus ornatus Villiers 1951

    Measurements: average length 8.75 - 12 mm, width 4.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Pyrrhocoris nigriceps Stål 1855119

  • Stål 1855a: 35

  • Cenaeus nigriceps Stål

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • Odontopus nigriceps Stål

  • Stål 1866: 7

  • Dindymus nigriceps Stål

  • Stål 1870: 113

  • Odontopus nigriceps Stål

  • Walker 1872: 175

  • Dindymus nigriceps Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 247

  • Dindymus natalensis Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 40

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus kilimanus Schouteden 1910

  • Schouteden 1910: 152

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus usambarae Schouteden 1910

  • Schouteden 1910: 152

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Dindymus natalensis Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 170

  • Dindymus nigriceps (Stål)

  • Hussey 1929: 60

  • Cenaeus kilimanus Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Cenaeus usambarae Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Cenaeus ornatus Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 143

  • illustration (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus kilimanus Schouteden

  • Schouteden 1957: 264

  • Cenaeus usambarae Schouteden

  • Schouteden 1957: 264

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) nigriceps (Stål)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 223

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) luridus (Reuter 1882)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Ghana

    Distribution: Cameroon; Central African Republic; Democratic Republic of Congo; Ghana; Guinea; Ivory Coast; Nigeria; Sudan; Uganda

    Synonyms: Cenaeus gowdeyi Bergroth 191212, Cenaeus ochraceus Blöte 1932

    Measurements: average length, male 9.2 mm (1), female 11.8 mm (8)

  • Cenaeus luridus Reuter 1882

  • Reuter 1882: 28

  • Cenaeus luridus Reuter

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus gowdeyi Bergroth 191212

  • Bergroth 1912b: 194

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus gowdeyi Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus gowdeyi Berg.

  • Bergroth 1926: 12

  • Cenaeus gowdeyi Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 66

  • Cenaeus luridus Reuter

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Cenaeus ochraceus Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933a: 2

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus luridus Reuter

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Cenaeus ochraceus Blöte

  • Villiers 1953: 29

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) luridus (Reuter)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 224

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris luridus R.

  • Linnavuori 1978: 8

  • Sericocoris luridus Reuter

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris gowdeyi Bergroth

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) distinguendus (Blöte 193321)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Ghana

    Distribution: Ghana; Ivory Coast; Nigeria; Uganda

    Measurements: average length, male 8.8 mm (1), female 11.7 mm (2)

  • Cenaeus distinguendus Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933b: 594

  • description

  • Cenaeus distinguendus Blöte

  • Villiers 1953: 299

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) distinguendus (Blöte)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 224

  • A
  • Sericocoris distinguendus (Blöte)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) obscuratus (Blöte 193321)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Sierra Leone

    Distribution: Sierra Leone

    Measurements: length 10.75 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus obscuratus Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933b: 593

  • description

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) obscuratus (Blöte)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) roseus (Villiers 1951)

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Guinea

    Distribution: Guinea

    Measurements: length of male 11 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus roseus Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 141

  • description

  • Cenaeus roseus Villiers

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) roseus (Villiers)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • illustration

  • Sericocoris roseus (Villiers)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 14

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) montanus (Villiers 1951)

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Ivory Coast

    Distribution: Ivory Coast

    Measurements: average length of female 13 - 14 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus montanus Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 142

  • description

  • Cenaeus montanus Villiers

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) montanus (Villiers)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Sericocoris montanus (Villiers)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 13

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) plebejus (Haglund 1895)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon

    Measurements: length 11 mm, width 3.5 mm, female (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus plebejus Haglund 1895

  • Haglund 1895: 466

  • description

  • Cenaeus plebejus Hagl.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus plebejus Haglund

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) plebejus (Haglund)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) apicicornis (Fairmaire 1858)

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Gabon

    Distribution: Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Gabon; Guinea; Uganda Measurements: average length of female 13.5 mm (2)

  • Odontopus apicicornis Fairmaire 1858

  • Fairmaire 1858: 307

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairm.

  • Stål 1863: 404

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairm.

  • Stål 1866: 9

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairm.

  • Stål 1870: 113

  • Pyrrhocoris apicicornis Fairm.

  • Walker 1872: 170

  • Cenaeus apicicornis (Fairm.)

  • Karsch 1894: 106

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairmaire

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairm.

  • Haglund 1895: 465

  • Cenaeus apicicornis (Fairmaire)

  • Hussey 1929: 65

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairm.

  • Blöte 1931: 115

  • Cenaeus apicicornis Fairmaire

  • Schmidt 1932: 255

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) apicicornis (Fairmaire)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Cenaeus apicicornis (Fairmaire)

  • Villiers 1967: 373

  • Specimens in the NMK collection extend the range of the species to DRC and Uganda, but maintain its West African affinities.

    Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) obuduanus Linnavuori 1988

    Type depository: in collection, of R. Linnavuori, Raisio, Finland

    Country of origin of type: Nigeria

    Distribution: Nigeria

    Measurements: length of male 14.5 mm, female 15.5–16.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Sericocoris (Pseudocenaeus) obuduanus Linnavuori 1988

  • Linnavuori 1988: 14

  • illustration

  • MYRMOPLASTA Gerstäcker 1892

    The species in this genus are ant-like. In this they differ from all the other genera of the Ethiopian Pyrrhocoroidea. All the species have a short rounded abdomen, which is strongly rounded below and with the upper surface rounded to some extent, with the thorax extended and restricted giving the appearance of a petiole. The genus is restricted to Eastern Africa, the most westerly record being in Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Type species: Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker 1892

    Country of origin of type species: Tanzania

    Type depository: not known

    Illustrations: see Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker 1892, Myrmoplasta potteri Martin 1900

  • Myrmoplasta Gerstäcker 1892

  • Gerstäcker 1892: 51

  • description

  • Myrmoplasta Gerstäcker

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 242, 250

  • Myrmoplasta Gerstäcker

  • Martin 1900: 20

  • Myrmoplasta Gerstäcker

  • Hussey 1929: 70

  • Myrmoplasta Gerstäcker

  • Schmidt 1932: 257

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker 1892

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Ethiopia; Tanzania

    Measurements: average length, male 7.5 mm (1), female 10.3 mm (3)

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker 1892

  • Gerstäcker 1892: 51

  • description, illustration

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 242, 250

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker

  • Hussey 1929: 70

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerstäcker

  • Schmidt 1932: 257

  • Myrmoplasta mira Gerst.

  • Schouteden 1957: 266

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin 1900

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Ethiopia

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Ethiopia; Kenya; Rwanda; Tanzania; Uganda

    Measurements: average length, male 6.2 mm (6), female 7.8 mm (16)

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin 1900

  • Martin 1900: 20

  • description

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Mart.

  • Distant 1909: 79

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Mart.

  • Bergroth 191314: 167

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin

  • Courteaux 1922: 285

  • description, illustration

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin

  • Hussey 1929: 70

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Mart.

  • Blöte 1931: 115

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin

  • Izzard 1950: 192

  • description, illustration

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Martin

  • Schouteden 1957: 266

  • Myrmoplasta potteri Mart.

  • Linnavuori 1978: 8

  • This species exhibits sexual dimorphism, the abdomen of the male being mostly black, while that of the female is striped black and yellow. The species is probably synonymous with M. vittiventris (see below). It is also recorded that the species may be brachypterous, the most common condition, or macropterous.

    Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carlini 1894

    Type depository: Genoa Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Uganda

    Measurements: length 8 mm, width 3.5 mm (female) (ex. Lit.)

  • Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carlini 1894

  • Carlini 1894: 471

  • description

  • Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carl.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 167

  • Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carlini

  • Hussey 1929: 70

  • Carlini described the species from a single female specimen. Comparing the texts of Carlini (1894) and Martin (1900) indicates that Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carlini 1894 and Myrmoplasta potteri Martin 1900 are one species although this cannot be resolved without examination of the type specimens. This, if correct, would then give Myrmoplasta vittiventris Carlini 1894 the priority.

    SIANGO Blöte 193321

    Type species: Siango variegata Blöte 193321

    Country of origin of type species: Uganda

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Illustrations: in Siango variegata Blöte 193321

    The genus is confined to Eastern Africa.

    Siango variegata Blöte 193321

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Kenya; Uganda

    Measurements: average length, male 10.1 mm (2), female 10.5 mm (1)

  • Siango variegata Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933b: 597

  • description, illustration

  • Siango blötei Schouteden 1933

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements: length of male 8 mm, length of female 10.5–11 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Siango Blötei Schouteden 1933

  • Schouteden 1933: 338

  • description

  • GROMIERUS Villiers 1951

    Type species: Gromierus rufipes Villiers 1951

    Country of origin of type species: Cameroon

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Illustrations: In Gromierus rufipes Villiers 1951

  • Gromerius Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 143

  • description

  • Gromierus Villiers

  • Stehlik 1979: 177

  • description, key

  • Gromierus rufipes Villiers 1951

    Type depository: Paris, Museum d'Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon; Democratic Republic of Congo; Rwanda

    Measurements: length 15.5 mm. There are also detailed measurements in Stehlik 1979.

  • Gromerius ruficeps Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 144

  • description, illustration

  • Gromerius ruficeps Villiers

  • Schouteden 1957; 263

  • Gromierus ruficeps Villiers

  • Stehlik 1979: 186

  • description, illustration

  • Gromierus schmitzi Stehlik 1979

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Illustrations: in Stehlik 1979

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1979.

  • Gromierus schmitzi Stehlik 1979

  • Stehlik 1979: 187

  • description, illustration

  • Gromierus fumatus Stehlik 1979

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda (E. Ruwenzori)

    Distribution: Uganda

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1979.

  • Gromierus schmitzi Stehlik 1979

  • Stehlik 1979: 190

  • description, illustration

  • Gromierus dollingi Stehlik 1979

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1979.

  • Gromierus dollingi Stehlik 1979

  • Stehlik 1979: 192

  • description, illustration

  • Gromierus minor Stehlik 1979

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1979.

  • Gromierus minor Stehlik 1979

  • Stehlik 1979: 194

  • description, illustration

  • SICNATUS Villiers and Dekeyser 1951

    Type species: Sicnatus leyei Villiers and Dekeyser 1951

    Country of origin of type species: Senegal

    Type depository: Dakar, L'Institut Francais de l'Afrique Noire

    Illustrations: see Sicnatus leyei Villiers and Dekeyser 1951

  • Sicnatus Villiers & Dekeyser

  • Stehlik 1965a: 235

  • Sicnatus leyei Villiers and Dekeyser 1951

    Type depository: Dakar, L'Institut Francais de l'Afrique Noire

    Country of origin of type: Senegal

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Senegal

    Measurements: length 8 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Sicnatus leyei Villiers & Dekeyser 1951

  • Villiers and Dekeyser 1951: 19

  • description, illustration

  • Sicnatus leyei Villiers

  • Villiers 1953: 299

  • Sicnatus leyei Villiers & Dekeyser

  • Schouteden 1957: 264

  • Sicnatus leyei Villiers

  • Linnavuori 1988: 17

  • NEOINDRA Stehlik 1965

    Type species: Neoindra basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

    Country of origin of type species: Tanzania

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Illustrations: see Neoindra basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

  • Neoindra Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 237

  • description

  • Neoindra basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965.

  • Neoindra basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 240

  • description, illustration

  • SCHMITZIANA Stehlik 1977

    The genus has three species, all of which are very rare, and is distributed very widely. The type species, Schmitziana pilosa Stehlik 1977 comes from South Africa (Transvaal) and is only known in a brachypterous form. Schmitziana polymorpha Stehlik 1977 comes from Democratic Republic of Congo (Upemba N.P.) and is known in both brachypterous and macropterous forms. Schmitziana grandis (Stehlik 1965) comes from Tanzania (Usambara Mtns., Mombo). Only the holotype is known and it is macropterous.

    Type species: Schmitziana pilosa Stehlik 1977

    Country of origin of type species: South Africa (Transvaal)

    Type depository: In the collection of J.A. Slater, Storrs, Connecticutt, USA.

  • Schmitziana Stehlik 1977

  • Stehlik 1977: 133

  • description, illustration, key

  • Schmitziana pilosa Stehlik 1977

    Type depository: In the collection of J.A. Slater, Storrs, Connecticutt, USA.

    Country of origin of type: South Africa (Transvaal)

    Distribution: South Africa

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1977.

  • Schmitziana pilosa Stehlik 1977

  • Stehlik 1977: 137

  • description, illustration

  • Schmitziana polymorpha Stehlik 1977

    Type depository: Brussels, Institute royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1977.

  • Schmitziana polymorpha Stehlik 1977

  • Stehlik 1977: 139

  • description, illustration

  • Schmitziana grandis (Stehlik 1965)

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Synonyms: Sicnatus grandis Stehlik 1965

    Illustrations: In Stehlik 1965, Plate VIII; In Stehlik 1977

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1977

  • Sicnatus grandis Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 236

  • description, illustration

  • Schmitziana grandis (Stehlik)

  • Stehlik 1977: 141

  • description, illustration

  • NEODINDYMUS Stehlik 1965

    Hussey in 1929 listed 47 species in the genus Dindymus. Only five of these came from the Ethiopian Region, the others being either Asian or Australasian. In 1965, Stehlik re-examined the genus and decided that the African species were not congeneric with the rest, and he created the new genus Neodindymus Stehlik 1965 to contain them. At present the genus is considered to contain thirteen species in the Ethiopian Region, eight of which have been recorded from Eastern Africa. The NMK collection contains at least one, and probably two, species that do not correspond to published descriptions.

    Type species: Neodindymus basilewskyi (Schouteden 1957). Designated by Stehlik 1965

    Country of origin of type species: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Synonyms: Dindymus Stål 1861

    Illustration: many illustrations, see under individual species

  • Dindymus Stål 1861

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • description (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 103

  • description

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin: 246

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Breddin 1901: 175

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Distant 1903: 110

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Distant 1914b: 342

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Taeuber 1927: 185

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 56

  • Dindymus Stål

  • Freeman 1947: 383

  • description

  • Neodindymus Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • description

  • Neodindymus acutus Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965

  • Neodindymus acutus Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • description, illustration

  • Neodindymus antennatus (Distant 1881)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Nigeria

    Distribution: Guinea; Nigeria

    Measurements: length 12 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dysdercus antennatus Distant 1881

  • Distant 1881: 275

  • description, illustration

  • Dysdercus antennatus Distant

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 252

  • Dysdercus antennatus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1920: 4

  • Dysdercus antennatus Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 86

  • Dindymus antennatus Distant

  • Blöte 1931: 117

  • Neodindymus antennatus Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • Neodindymus antennatus (Distant)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 16

  • Neodindymus basilewskyi (Schouteden 1957)

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Tanzania; Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements: average length of male 11.6 mm (7), of female 13.2 mm (7)

  • Dindymus basilewskyi Schouteden 1957

  • Schouteden 1957: 264

  • description

  • Neodindymus basilewskyi (Schouteden)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 227

  • illustration

  • Neodindymus bipustulatus (Stål 1874)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: Zanzibar

    Distribution: Tanzania; Zanzibar

    Synonyms: Dindymus maculipennis Villiers 1951

    Measurements: average length of male 11.3 mm (25), of female 13.7 mm (20)

  • Dindymus bipustulatus Stål 1874

  • Stål 1874: 168

  • description

  • Dindymus bipustulatus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 246

  • Dindymus bipustulatus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 57

  • Dindymus maculipennis Villiers 1951

  • Villiers 1951: 144

  • description, illustration, (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Neodindymus bipustulatus (Stål)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • All the specimens in the NMK collection were collected at a UV light trap in eastern Tanzania, just inland from Tanga. The only previous records have been from Zanzibar, so the species seems to be restricted to the coastal areas of northern Tanzania.

    Neodindymus brunneus Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965.

  • Neodindymus brunneus Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 232

  • description, illustration

  • Neodindymus flavipes (Signoret 1858)

    Type depository: Vienna, Naturhistorische Museum

    Country of origin of type: Gabon

    Distribution: Congo (Brazzaville); Gabon; Guinea; Ivory Coast; Nigeria

    Synonyms: Dysdercus nigrotarsus Signoret 1858

    Measurements: length 7–12 mm, width 4–4.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dysdercus flavipes Signoret 1858

  • Signoret 1858: 308

  • description

  • Dysdercus nigrotarsus Signoret 1858

  • Signoret 1858: 308

  • (syn. Stål 1863)

  • Dysdercus flavipes Sign.

  • Stål 1863: 403

  • description

  • Odontopus flavipes Sign.

  • Stål 1866: 7

  • description

  • Dindymus flavipes Sign.

  • Stål 1870: 113

  • Odontopus flavipes Sign.

  • Walker 1872: 175

  • Dindymus flavipes Sign.

  • Signoret 1886: 27

  • Dindymus flavipes Signoret

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 247

  • Sericocoris flavipes (Sign.)

  • Distant 1919: 220

  • Dindymus flavipes (Signoret)

  • Hussey 1929: 59

  • Dindymus flavipes Sign.

  • Sauvaut 1949: 154

  • description, illustration

  • Dindymus flavipes Signoret

  • Villiers 1953: 298

  • Neodindymus flavipes (Signoret)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 227

  • illustration

  • Neodindymus flavipes (Signoret)

  • Villiers 1967: 373

  • Neodindymus flavipes (Signoret)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 15

  • Neodindymus leleupi Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965.

    There are four specimens in the NMK collection, all from the Usambara mountains in Tanzania. The type locality is in the Uluguru Mountains, about 200 km to the south.

  • Neodindymus leleupi Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 230

  • description, illustration

  • Neodindymus migratorius (Distant 1903)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Malawi

    Distribution: Benin; Congo (Brazzaville); Guinea; Ivory Coast; Kenya; Malawi; Tanzania; Uganda

    Synonyms: Cenaeus argillosus Bergroth 191212

    Measurements: average length, male 10.8 mm (5), female 11.3 mm (17)

  • Dysdercus migratorius Distant 1903

  • Distant 1903: 120

  • description

  • Dysdercus migratorius Dist.

  • Schouteden 1912: 304

  • description

  • Cenaeus argillosus Bergroth 191212

  • Bergroth 1912a: 315

  • description (syn stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus argillosus Bergr.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Dysdercus migratorius Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 173

  • Cenaeus argillosus Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 66

  • Dysdercus migratorius Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 95

  • Neodindymus migratorius (Distant)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • description, illustration

  • Neodindymus migratorius (Distant)

  • Villiers 1967: 372

  • Neodindymus migratorius (Distant)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 15

  • Neodindymus relatus (Distant 190237)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: length 12 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dindymus relatus Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 40

  • description

  • Dindymus relatus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Dindymus relatus Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 61

  • Neodindymus relatus Distant

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • Neodindymus schoutedeni Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Kenya

    Distribution: Kenya

    Measurements: Detailed measurements and also a comparison of the measurements of several related species are given in Stehlik 1965.

  • Neodindymus schoutedeni Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 233

  • description, illustration

  • Neodindymus sjostedti (Schouteden 1910)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Kenya; Rwanda; Tanzania

    Measurements: average length of male 10.8 mm (2), of female 13.4 mm (3)

  • Cenaeus sjostedti Schouteden 1910

  • Schouteden 1910: 152

  • description

  • Cenaeus sjostedti Schout.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus sjostedti Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Cenaeus sjostedti Schouteden

  • Schouteden 1957: 265

  • Neodindymus sjostedti (Schouteden)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • illustration

  • Neodindymus tenebrosus (Blöte 193321)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania

    Measurements: length of male 12.5 mm (ex. lit.)

  • Dindymus tenebrosus Blöte 193321

  • Blöte 1933b: 593

  • Dindymus tenebrosus (Blöte)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 228

  • Neodindymus elegans Linnavuori 1988

    Type depository: In the collection of R.E. Linnavuori, Raisio, Finland

    Country of origin of type: Nigeria

    Distribution: Nigeria

    Illustrations: in Linnavuori 1988

    Measurements: length 14.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Neodindymus elegans Linnavuori 1988

  • Linnavuori 1988: 15

  • CENAEUS Stål 186

    Type species: Cenaeus carnifex (Fabricius 1775). Designated as lagotype by Hussey 1929

    Country of origin of type species: South Africa

    Type depository: not known

    Synonyms: Obstetrixella Schmidt 1932

    Illustrations: see Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker 1873; Cenaeus basilewskyi Stehlik 1965; Cenaeus carnifex (Fabricius 1775); Cenaeus semiflavus Distant 190237

  • Cenaeus Stål 1861

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • description

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Stål 1866: 3

  • description

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 102

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Walker 1872: 164

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 65

  • Cenaeus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 254

  • Obstetrixella Schmidt 1932

  • Schmidt 1932: 256

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Cenaeus Stål Stehlik 1965a: 216.

  • description

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker 1873.

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Kenya

    Distribution: Ethiopia; Kenya; Rwanda; Tanzania

    Synonyms: Obstetrixella abortiva Schmidt 1932

    Measurements: average length, male 7.8 mm (4), female 8.8 mm (12)

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker 1873

  • Gerstäcker 1873: 413

  • description, illustration

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstaecker

  • Schouteden 1910: 152

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker

  • Hussey 1929: 65

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker

  • Schmidt 1932: 255

  • description

  • Obstetrixella abortivus Gerstäcker

  • Schouteden 1957: 266

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerst.

  • Mancini 1961: 31

  • Cenaeus abortivus Gerstäcker

  • Stehlik 1965a: 218

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth 191212

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Guinea

    Distribution: Congo(Brazzaville); Guinea; Ivory Coast

    Measurements: length 12 mm (female). (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth 191212

  • Bergroth 1912a: 314

  • description

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 65

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Cenaeus annulifer Bergroth

  • Villiers 1967: 373

  • Cenaeus basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Sudan; Tanzania

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965.

  • Cenaeus basilewskyi Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 218

  • description, illustration

  • Cenaeus basilewskyi Stlk.

  • Linnavuori 1978: 8

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund 1895

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); Fernando Poo; Gabon

    Measurements : length 12 mm; width 4.5 mm. (Female). (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund 1895

  • Haglund 1895: 465

  • description

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund

  • Hussey 1929: 66

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund

  • Schmidt 1932: 255

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Hagl.

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Cenaeus bifasciatus Haglund

  • Villiers 1967: 373

  • Cenaeus carnifex (Fabricius 1775)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: South Africa

    Distribution: South Africa (other countries in the literature are stated by Hussey 1929 to be in error)

    Synonyms: Cimex capensis-ruber De Geer 1778, Lygaeus immaculatus Thunberg 1822, Pyrrhocoris scutellaris Hahn 1834, Pyrrhocoris sanguineus Fieber 1861

    Measurements : length 7.5–10 mm, width 4 mm (ex. lit.)

  • Cimex carnifex Fabricius 1775

  • Fabricius 1775: 721

  • description

  • Cimex carnifex Fabric.

  • Goeze 1778: 258

  • Cimex capensis ruber

  • De Geer 1778: 619

  • description, illustration, (syn. Burmeister 1835)

  • Cimex carnifex

  • Fabricius 1781: 366

  • Cimex capensis ruber

  • Retzius 1783: 85

  • Cimex carnifex

  • Fabricius 1787: 301

  • Cimex carnifex

  • Gmelin 1788: 2174

  • Cimex carnifex

  • Fabricius 1794: 160

  • Lygaeus carnifex Fabr.

  • Fabricius 1803: 226

  • Lygaeus carnifex Fabric.

  • Thunberg 1822: 1

  • description

  • Lygaeus immaculatus Thunberg 1822

  • Thunberg 1822: 1

  • (syn. Stål 1855119)

  • Pyrrhocoris scutellaris Hahn 1834

  • Hahn 1834: 118

  • description (syn. Blanchard 1840)

  • Pyrrhocoris carnifex Fabr.

  • Burmeister 1835: 286

  • Astemma carnifex Blanchard 1840

  • Blanchard 1840: 129

  • description

  • Dysdercus carnifex

  • Herrich-Schaffer 1850: 177

  • Lygaeus immaculatus Thunberg

  • Stål 1855>119: 347

  • Dysdercus carnifex Fab.

  • Uhler 1861: 229

  • Pyrrhocoris sanguineus Fieber 1861

  • Fieber 1861: 162

  • description (syn. Stål 1870)

  • Pyrrhocoris carnifex F.

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabr.

  • Stål 1866: 9

  • description

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabr.

  • Stål 1866: 255

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabr.

  • Mayr 1868: 134

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabr.

  • Stål 1870: 114

  • Pyrrhocoris carnifex Fabr.

  • Walker 1872: 168

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabricius

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabricius

  • Hussey 1929: 66

  • Cenaeus carnifex F.

  • Blöte 1931: 115

  • Cenaeus carnifex Fabricius

  • Schmidt 1932: 254

  • Cenaeus carnifex (Fabricius)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 218

  • illustration

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth 18947

    Type depository: not known.

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon.

    Distribution: Cameroon; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Gabon.

    Measurements: length 12–12.3 mm. (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth 18947

  • Bergroth 1894b: 539

  • description

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 66

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth

  • Schmidt 1932: 255

  • description

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Cenaeus dimidiaticeps Bergroth

  • Villiers 1967: 373

  • Cenaeus longulus Bergroth 18947

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Gabon

    Distribution: Gabon

    Measurements : length 14 mm (female) (ex. Lit).

  • Cenaeus longulus Bergroth 18947

  • Bergroth 1894b: 540

  • description

  • Cenaeus longulus Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus longulus Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Cenaeus longulus Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • Cenaeus pectoralis (Stål 1855119)

    Type depository: not known.

    Country of origin of type: Republic of South Africa

    Distribution: Ethiopia; Mozambique; South Africa

    Measurements: length, male 7.8 mm (1), female 8.7 mm (1)

  • Pyrrhocoris pectoralis Stål 1855119

  • Stål 1855a: 36

  • description

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Stål 1866: 9

  • description

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Stål 1870: 114

  • Pyrrhocoris pectoralis Stål

  • Walker 1872: 170

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 248

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Montandon 1899: 218

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Courteaux 1922: 285

  • Cenaeus pectoralis (Stål)

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Cenaeus pectoralis Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 255

  • Cenaeus pectoralis (Stål)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 218

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Distant 190237

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Rwanda; Uganda

    Measurements: average length male 7.2 mm (2), female 9.3 mm (3)

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Distant 190237

  • Distant 1902b: 41

  • description, illustration

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Dist.

  • Distant 1909: 79

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Dist.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Distant

  • Hussey 1929: 67

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Distant

  • Schouteden 1957: 264

  • Cenaeus semiflavus Distant

  • Stehlik 1965a: 218

  • Cenaeus suspectus Schouteden 1957

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo

    Measurements : length 11.5–12.5 mm. (ex. Lit.)

  • Cenaeus suspectus Schouteden 1957

  • Schouteden 1957: 265

  • description

  • Cenaeus suspectus Schout.

  • Stehlik 1965a: 225

  • DERMATINUS Stål 1853

    Hussey (1929) listed ten species in the genus Dermatinus Stål 1853, two from India and the rest from the Ethiopian Region. However, when Stehlik (1965) re-examined specimens he came to the conclusion that many of the species were not congeneric with Dermatinus Stål 1853. He indicated that further revision was needed and that “with certainty” he only accepted Dermatinus limbifer Stål 1855119 and Dermatinus lugens Stål 1854 as correctly placed in the genus Dermatinus. Since then Dermatinus apicalis Reuter 1881 has been transferred to Aderrhis by Linnavuori (1988). As matters stand at present, pending further revision, there are four species of the genus Dermatinus in the Ethiopian Region.

    Type species: Dermatinus lugens (Fabricius). Quoted as a monotype by Hussey 1929, because when Stål named the genus in 1853 he did not name a type species. The type species was then named in the 1854 paper.

    Country of origin of type species: South Africa.

    Type depository: not known

  • Dermatinus Stål 1853

  • Stål 1853: 260

  • description

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Stål 1854: 236

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Stål 1855a: 36

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Stål 1861: 196

  • description

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Stål 1866: 4

  • description

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 102

  • Pyrrhocoris Fall.

  • Walker 1872: 167

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Distant 1903: 115

  • description

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Hesse 1925: 86

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Dermatinus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 256

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Lethierry 1883

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Ethiopia

    Distribution: Ethiopia

    Measurements : length 8 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Lethierry 1883

  • Lethierry 1883: 749

  • description

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Lethierry

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Lethierry

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Leth.

  • Mancini 1961: 31

  • From the description of Dermatinus aethiopicus given by Lethierry 1883, it may well be conspecific with Dermatinus limbifer

    Dermatinus limbifer Stäl 1855119

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: South Africa (Natal)

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Mozambique; Namibia; South Africa.

    Measurements: average length, male 7.0 mm (1), female 8.2 mm (2)

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål 1855119

  • Stål 1855a: 36

  • description

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Stål 1866: 12

  • description

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Stål 1870: 114

  • Pyrrhocoris limbifer Stål

  • Walker 1872: 170

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Wallengren 1875: 134

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Montandon 1899: 218

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Distant 1903: 115

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Hesse 1925: 86

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 256

  • Dermatinus limbifer Stål

  • Schouteden 1957: 266

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål 1854

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: South Africa

    Distribution: South Africa

    Measurements : length 6–7 mm, width 2.5–3.5 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål 1854

  • Stål 1854: 236

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris lugens Stål

  • Stål 1860: 253

  • description

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål

  • Stål 1866: 12

  • description

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål

  • Stål 1870: 114

  • Pyrrhocoris lugens Stål

  • Walker 1872: 170

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus lugens Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Dermatinus notatus Wallengren 1875

    Type depository: University of Lund, Zoological Institute

    Country of origin of type: South Africa

    Distribution: South Africa

    Measurements : length 6–8 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Dermatinus notatus Wallengren 1875

  • Wallengren 1875: 134

  • description

  • Dermatinus notatus Wallengren

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus notatus Wallengren

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Aderrhis notata (Wallengren)

  • Stehlik 1966a: 325

  • Stehlik 1965, without pursuing the matter, indicated that he considered Dermatinus notatus Wallengren 1875 to belong to Aderrhis.

    ADERRHIS Bergroth 1906

    Type species: Aderrhis pulla Bergroth 1906

    Country of origin of type species: Zanzibar

    Type depository: not known

    Illustrations: see Aderrhis flavipes Stehlik 1966, Aderrhis hirsuta Stehlik 1966, Aderrhis minuta Stehlik 1966, Aderrhis pulla Bergroth 1906, Aderrhis schultzi (Schouteden 1910), Aderrhis thoracica Stehlik 1965, Aderrhis apicalis (Reuter 1881)

  • Adherris Bergroth 1906

  • Bergroth 1906: 199

  • description

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1906: 251

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Hesse 1925: 87

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Schmidt 1932: 257

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1965a: 241

  • description

  • Aderrhis Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1966a: 321

  • description

  • Aderrhis africana (Courteaux 1907)

    Type depository: Paris, Museum de Histoire Naturelle

    Country of origin of type: Ethiopia

    Distribution: Ethiopia; Kenya; Uganda

    Measurements: average length male 5.9 mm (3), female 8.1 mm (3)

  • Dermatinus aethiopicus Courteaux 1907

  • Courteaux 1907: 330

  • description

  • Dermatinus africanus Courteaux 1908

  • Courteaux 1908: 192

  • Aderrhis aethiopica Court.

  • Bergroth 1912a: 316

  • Aderrhis aethiopica Court.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Dermatinus africanus Courteaux

  • Courteaux 1922: 385

  • description

  • Aderrhis africana Courteaux

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Aderrhis apicalis (Reuter 1882)

    Type depository: not known.

    Country of origin of type: Ghana

    Distribution: Ghana

    Measurements: length 7.5 mm. (male) (ex. Lit.)

  • Dermatinus apicalis Reuter 1882

  • Reuter 1882: 28

  • description

  • Dermatinus apicalis Reuter

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus apicalis Reuter

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Aderrhis apicalis Reuter

  • Stehlik 1966a: 327

  • Aderrhis apicalis Reuter

  • Linnavuori 1988: 16

  • Aderrhis flavipes Stehlik 1966

    Type depository: Brno, Department of Entomology, Moravian Museum

    Country of origin of type: Uganda

    Distribution: Uganda

    Measurements : Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1966.

  • Aderrhis flavipes Stehlik 1966

  • Stehlik 1966a: 321

  • description, illustration

  • Aderrhis flavipes Stlk.

  • Linnavuori 1978: 8

  • Aderrhis flavipes Stehlik

  • Linnavuori 1988: 16

  • illustration

  • Aderrhis hirsuta Stehlik 1966

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Senegal

    Distribution: Senegal

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1966.

  • Aderrhis hirsuta Stehlik 1966

  • Stehlik 1966a: 325

  • description, illustration

  • Aderrhis minuta Stehlik 1966

    Type depository: Brno, Department of Entomology, Moravian Museum

    Country of origin of type: South Africa.

    Distribution: South Africa.

    Measurements : Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1966.

  • Aderrhis minuta Stehlik 1966

  • Stehlik 1966a: 323

  • description, illustration

  • Aderrhis pulla Bergroth 1906

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Zanzibar (Pemba Is.)

    Distribution: Namibia; South Africa; Zanzibar.

    Measurements: length 5–5.5 mm (male) (ex. Lit.)

  • Aderrhis pulla Bergroth 1906

  • Bergroth 1906: 200

  • description, illustration

  • Aderrhis pulla Bergroth

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Aderrhis pulla Bergr.

  • Hesse 1925: 87

  • illustration

  • Aderrhis pulla Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 70

  • Aderrhis schulzi (Schouteden 1910)

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Tanzania; Kenya.

    Synonyms: Dermatinus distinctus Schouteden 1910.

    Measurements: Detailed measurements are given in Stehlik 1965.

  • Dermatinus schulzi Schouteden 1910

  • Schouteden 1910: 153

  • description

  • Dermatinus distinctus Schouteden 1910

  • Schouteden 1910: 153

  • (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Dermatinus distinctus Schout.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Dermatinus schulzi Schout.

  • Bergroth 1913a: 171

  • Dermatinus distinctus Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 68

  • Dermatinus schulzi Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Aderrhis schulzi (Schouteden)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 241

  • description, illustration

  • Aderrhis tartarea (Stål 1855)

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum

    Country of origin of type: South Africa (Natal)

    Distribution: Democratic Republic of Congo; Ethiopia; Namibia; South Africa; Tanzania

    Synonyms: Pyrrhocoris truncatipennis Fallou 1891

    Measurements: length 7–8 mm, width 3 mm (male) (ex. Lit.)

  • Dermatinus tartarea Stål 1855119

  • Stål 1855a: 36

  • description

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Stål 1866: 12

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Stål 1870: 114

  • Pyrrhocoris tartareus Stål

  • Walker 1872: 170

  • Pyrrhocoris truncatipennis Fallou 1891

  • Fallou 1891: 8

  • description (syn. Bergroth 1892)

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Bergroth 1892: 262

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 249

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Courteaux 1922: 285

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Hesse 1925: 86

  • description, illustration

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 256

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål

  • Schouteden 1957: 266

  • Aderrhis tartareus (Stål)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 245

  • description

  • Aderrhis thoracica Stehlik 1965

    Type depository: Tervuren, Musee Royal de l'Afrique Centrale

    Country of origin of type: Tanzania

    Distribution: Kenya: Tanzania

    Synonyms: Dermatinus tartareus Schouteden 1910

    Measurements: Detailed measuremants are given in Stehlik 1965

  • Dermatinus tartareus Stål 1855119

  • Schouteden 1910: 153 (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Dermatinus tartareus Schouteden

  • Hussey 1929: 69

  • Aderrhis thoracica Stehlik 1965

  • Stehlik 1965a: 243

  • description, illustration

  • SCANTIUS Stål 1866

    Hussey (1929) listed thirteen species in this genus, six from Asia, one from Madagascar, one from North Africa, and six from the Ethiopian Region. Stehlik (1965) examined many specimens from different sources and synonymised Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar 1879 with Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781). He also gave strong reasons for synonymising Scantius volucris (Gerstäcker 1873) with Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781) but it has been retained as a separate species in this paper. Here, therefore, pending further revision, five species of the genus Scantius are recognised in the Ethiopian Region.

    The members of the genus cover almost the whole of the Ethiopian Region and Scantius forsteri spreads into North Africa the Middle East. There are considerable differences in morphology and color over the whole range, and this is discussed in some detail by Stehlik (1965) in respect to Scantius forsteri.

    Type species: Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781). Quoted as a Lagotype by Hussey 1929.

    Country of origin of type species: South Africa.

    Type depository: not known.

    Illustrations: see Scantius caraboides Bergroth 1920, Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781), Scantius volucris (Gerstäcker 1873).

  • Scantius Stål 1866

  • Stål 1866: 3

  • description

  • Scantius Stål

  • Stål 1870: 102

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris Fall.

  • Walker 1872: 167

  • Scantius Stål

  • Reuter 1885: 230

  • description

  • Scantius Stål

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 251

  • Scantius Stål

  • Distant 1903: 117

  • description

  • Scantius Stål

  • Hesse 1925: 87

  • Scantius Stål

  • Hussey 1929: 80

  • Scantius Stål

  • Schmidt 1932: 259

  • Scantius Stål

  • Stehlik 1965a: 246

  • Scantius aethiopicus (Distant 1919)

    Type depository: London, Natural History Museum

    Country of origin of type: Cameroon

    Distribution: Cameroon; Gambia

    Measurements: length 7 - 8 mm (ex. Lit.)

  • Delacampius aethiopicus Distant 1919

  • Distant 1919: 220

  • description

  • Scantius aethiopicus Dist.

  • Blöte 1931: 116

  • Scantius caraboides Bergroth 1920

    Type depository: Stockholm, Naturhistoriska Riksmuseum.

    Country of origin of type: Kenya.

    Distribution: Ethiopea; Kenya; Tanzania.

    Measurements: average length male 7.3 mm (4)

  • Scantius caraboides Bergroth 1920

  • Bergroth 1920: 3

  • description

  • Scantius caraboides Bergroth

  • Hussey 1929: 82

  • Scantius caraboides Bergr.

  • Mancini 1954: 166

  • Scantius caraboides Bergroth

  • Stehlik 1965a: 248

  • description, illustration

  • Scantius caraboides Bergroth

  • Linnavuori 1982: 14

  • Scantius circumcinctus (Lethierry 1883)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Ethiopia

    Distribution: Congo (Brazzaville); Ethiopia; Zambia

    Synonyms: Delacampius rhodesianus Distant 1919

    Measurements: average length, male 8.2 mm (4), female 7.5 mm (4)

  • Pyrrhocoris circumcinctus Lethierry 1883

  • Lethierry 1883: 747

  • description

  • Scantius circumcinctus Lethierry

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 251

  • Scantius circumcinctus Leth.

  • Bergroth 1906: 371

  • description

  • Delacampius rhodesianus Distant 1919

  • Distant 1919: 220

  • description (syn. Blote 1931)

  • Scantius circumcinctus (Lethierry)

  • Hussey 1929: 82

  • Scantius rhodesianus (Distant)

  • Blöte 1931: 117

  • Scantius circumcinctus Leth.

  • Blöte 1933b: 599

  • description

  • Sicnatus circumcinctus (Lethierry)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 17

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: South Africa

    Distribution: Angola; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo; Eritrea; Ethiopia; Kenya; Mali; Mozambique; Namibia; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; South Africa; Tanzania; Zanzibar

    Synonyms: Cimex clavimanus Fabricius 1781, Cimex deustus Thunberg 1784, Dermatinus centralis Signoret 1861, Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar 1879

    Measurements: average length, male 7.7 mm (25), female 7.9 mm (25)

  • Cimex forsteri Fabricius 1781

  • Fabricius 1781: 368

  • description

  • Cimex clavimanus Fabricius 1781

  • Fabricius 1781: 368

  • (syn. Stål 1862)

  • Cimex deustus Thunberg 1784

  • Thunberg 1784: 58

  • description (syn. Stål 1855)

  • Cimex forsteri Fabricius

  • Fabricius 1787: 302

  • Cimex clavimanus Fabricius

  • Fabricius 1787: 302

  • Cimex deustus Thunb.

  • Gmelin 1788: 2168

  • Cimex forsteri Fabr.

  • Gmelin 1788: 2177

  • Lygaeus forsteri Fabr.

  • Fabricius 1794: 164

  • Lygaeus clavimanus Fabr.

  • Fabricius 1794: 165

  • Lygaeus forsteri Fabricius

  • Fabricius 1803: 230

  • Lygaeus clavimanus Fabricius

  • Fabricius 1803: 231

  • Lygaeus deustus Thunberg

  • Thunberg 1822: 3

  • Lygaeus forsteri Fabr.

  • Burmeister 1835: 286

  • Pyrrhocoris clavimanus Fabricius

  • Herrich-Schaffer 1847: 102

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris forsteri Fabricius

  • Herrich-Schaffer 1847: 102

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Stål 1855b: 346

  • Pyrrhocoris forsteri Fab.

  • Uhler 1861: 229

  • Dermatinus centralis Signoret 1861

  • Signoret 1861: 952

  • description (syn. Stål 1866)

  • Lygaeus forsteri Fab.

  • Stål 1862: 500

  • Pyrrhocoris forsteri Herrich-Schaffer

  • Schaum 1862: 44

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Stål 1866: 10

  • description

  • Pyrrhocoris deustus Thunb.

  • Mayr 1868: 135

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Stål 1870: 117

  • Pyrrhocoris forsteri Fabr.

  • Walker 1872: 169

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar 1879

  • Bolivar 1879: 142

  • description (syn. Stehlik 1965)

  • Pyrrhocoris forsteri Fab.

  • Puton 1881: 4

  • Scantius foersteri Fabr.

  • Lethierry 1883: 747

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Reuter 1885: 231

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabr.)

  • Reuter 1888: 216

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Bergroth 1893: 126

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 251

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 251

  • Scantius forsteri

  • Montandon 1899: 219

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bol.

  • Schouteden 1905a: 10

  • description

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Distant 1910: 98

  • description

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar

  • Schouteden 1910: 153

  • Scantius foersteri Fabricius

  • Schouteden 1910: 153

  • Scantius forsteri F.

  • Oshanin 1912: 26

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Bergroth 1914: 5

  • Scantius forsteri Fabr.

  • Hesse 1925: 87

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar

  • Hussey 1929: 82

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius)

  • Hussey 1929: 82

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bol.

  • Blöte 1931: 116

  • Scantius forsteri F.

  • Blöte 1931: 116

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Schmidt 1932: 259

  • Scantius abyssinicus Bolivar

  • Schmidt 1932: 259

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Villiers 1950a: 323

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Villiers 1953: 299

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Schouteden 1957: 267

  • Scantius forsteri F.

  • Mancini 1961: 31

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius)

  • Stehlik 1965a: 246

  • description, illustration

  • Scantius forsteri Fabricius

  • Villiers 1967: 374

  • Scantius forsteri (F.)

  • Linnavuori 1977: 61

  • Scantius forsteri (F.)

  • Linnavuori 1978: 8

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781)

  • Linnavuori 1982: 13

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius 1781)

  • Linnavuori 1986: 109

  • Scantius forsteri (Fabricius)

  • Linnavuori 1988: 17

  • Scantius volucris (Gerstäcker 1873)

    Type depository: not known

    Country of origin of type: Kenya

    Distribution: Angola; Ethiopia; Kenya; Tanzania; Uganda; Zambia

    Measurements: length 7 - 9 mm, width 3.75 (ex. Lit.)

  • Pyrrhocoris volucris Gerstäcker 1873

  • Gerstäcker 1873: 413

  • description

  • Scantius volucris Gerstäcker

  • Lethierry and Severin 1894: 251

  • Scantius volucris Gerst.

  • Distant 1901: 590

  • Scantius volucris Gerstäcker

  • Distant 1903: 117

  • description, illustration

  • Scantius volucris Gerst.

  • Lefroy 1909: 326

  • Scantius volucris Gerst.

  • Distant 1910: 98

  • Scantius volucris Gerstäcker

  • Hussey 1929: 83

  • Scantius volucris Gerst.

  • Blöte 1931: 117

  • Scantius volucris Gerst.

  • Stehlik 1965a: 247

  • description

  • DYSDERCUS Guerin 1831

    Subgenus Dysdercus Stehlik 1965

  • superstitiosus (Fabricius 1775)

  • (=volkeri Schmidt 1932)

  • (syn. Freeman 1947)

  • nigrofasciatus Stål 1855119

  • melanoderes Karsch 1892

  • fasciatus Signoret 1861

  • cardinalis Gerstäcker 1873

  • Subgenus Neodysdercus Stehlik 1965

  • intermedius Distant 1902

  • orientalis Schouteden 1910

  • pretiosus Distant 1902

  • haemorrhoidalis Signoret 1858

  • Subgenus Paradysdercus Stehlik 1965

    Acknowledgments

    I wish to express my appreciation of the help given in the preparation of this paper for publication by the late Professor R.F.Chapman of the Arizona Research Laboratories Division of Neurobiology, University of Arizona. Professor Chapman was a friend and colleague of long standing and encouraged me to finalize this catalog.

    Editor's Note

    Paper copies of this article will be deposited in the following libraries. Senckenberg Library, Frankfurt Germany; National Museum of Natural History, Paris, France; Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois USA; the University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA; the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona USA; Smithsonian Institution Libraries, Washington D.C. U.S.A.; The Linnean Society, London, England.

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    I. A. D. Robertson "The Pyrrhocoroidea (Hemiptera – Heteroptera) of the Ethiopian region," Journal of Insect Science 4(14), 1-43, (1 May 2004). https://doi.org/10.1673/031.004.1401
    Received: 16 July 2002; Accepted: 1 October 2002; Published: 1 May 2004
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