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1 April 2005 A Systematic Review of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) with Recombinant Follicle-stimulating Hormone (rFSH) versus Urinary Gonadotropin in GnRH Protocols for Pituitary Desensitization in Assisted Reproduction Cycles
Harumi Kubo
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Abstract

This article systematically reviews the relevant clinical data of rFSH for COS in ART, which were mainly obtained from the Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, and reference lists of articles. HMG and rFSH have both been used equally successfully for COS in ART. However the another review has concluded that there is a statistically significant increase in clinical pregnancy rate with rFSH compared to uFSH, when used for COS in standard IVF cycles but not in cycles in which ICSI was used. Recombinant FSH is a new treatment option for Japanese women undergoing COS for ART with several advantages over conventional urinary gonadotropin preparations. Since SC administration of rFSH is safe, efficacious, and acceptable, the availability of rFSH as a ready-for-use solution supplied in an injector system may make its administration, in particular self-administration by the patient or her partner, more convenient the current review concludes that the use of rFSH is not associated with a higher incidence of obstetrical and neonatal problems compared to urinary gonadotropins.

Harumi Kubo "A Systematic Review of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) with Recombinant Follicle-stimulating Hormone (rFSH) versus Urinary Gonadotropin in GnRH Protocols for Pituitary Desensitization in Assisted Reproduction Cycles," Journal of Mammalian Ova Research 22(1), 2-12, (1 April 2005). https://doi.org/10.1274/jmor.22.2
Received: 10 March 2005; Accepted: 1 March 2005; Published: 1 April 2005
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KEYWORDS
Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS)
Recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH)
Self-administration
Urinary gonadotropin
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