Translator Disclaimer
1 October 2008 Chimerism in Pregnancy by Assisted Reproductive Technology
Kiyonori Miura, Hideaki Masuzaki
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

As several cases of chimerism have been reported in pregnancy by assisted reproductive technology (ART), ART-related problems include not only an increased risk of multiple pregnancy but also a possibility of chimerism. In particular, confinedblood chimerism (CBC), which is attributable to placental vessel anastomosis between twins, has been detected in 11 cases of monochorionic dizygotic twins. It is possible that three or four alleles could be detected in patients with CBC, misleading physicians at the time of blood transfusion or genotyping for transplantation of an allograft. Therefore, sufficient informed consent and genetic counseling prior to ART are absolutely necessary for patient quality of life. ART may increase the chance of cell fusion (or cell cleavage) during embryogenesis, causing a increased risk of chimerism. Elective single-embryo transfer could avoid chimerism caused by cell-fusion after embryo transfer, but not chimerism generated before embryo transfer. To clarify the problem of chimerism in pregnancy by ART and determine solutions for this problem, both long-term follow-up of cases of chimerism and molecular genetic analysis using DNA polymorphic markers are essential.

Kiyonori Miura and Hideaki Masuzaki "Chimerism in Pregnancy by Assisted Reproductive Technology," Journal of Mammalian Ova Research 25(4), 206-212, (1 October 2008). https://doi.org/10.1274/0916-7625-25.4.206
Published: 1 October 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
Assited Reproductive Technology
Chimerism
molecular analysis
Monochorionic dizygotic twin
mosaicism
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top