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1 February 2002 SUBADULT DISPERSAL IN A MONOGAMOUS SPECIES: THE ALABAMA BEACH MOUSE (PEROMYSCUS POLIONOTUS AMMOBATES)
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Abstract

Dispersal and philopatric tendencies were examined in Alabama beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) during a 26-month study. Data on microgeographic dispersal (126,410 trap nights) were used to test hypotheses relating to dispersal, persistence time, and home-range size. We predicted that dispersal between zones would be nonrandom and that dispersal patterns would fit a simple competition-based model. In addition, we predicted that philopatry would be beneficial in terms of persistence times and home-range size. Counter to our prediction, dispersal distance (average 160.2 m) was equal both within and between habitat zones. Home-range size (average 3,586.2 m2) was significantly smaller for philopatric mice (1,933.7 m2) but persistence times were longer for dispersers ( 37.5 days). We hypothesize that predation risk may counteract normal advantages of philopatry for this population.

William R. Swilling Jr. and Michael C. Wooten "SUBADULT DISPERSAL IN A MONOGAMOUS SPECIES: THE ALABAMA BEACH MOUSE (PEROMYSCUS POLIONOTUS AMMOBATES)," Journal of Mammalogy 83(1), 252-259, (1 February 2002). https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2002)083<0252:SDIAMS>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 7 June 2001; Published: 1 February 2002
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