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1 February 2003 SEA OTTER POPULATION DECLINES IN THE ALEUTIAN ARCHIPELAGO
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Abstract

Sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations were exploited to near extinction and began to recover after the cessation of commercial hunting in 1911. Remnant colonies of sea otters in the Aleutian archipelago were among the first to recover; they continued to increase through the 1980s but declined abruptly during the 1990s. We conducted an aerial survey of the Aleutian archipelago in 2000 and compared results with similar surveys conducted in 1965 and 1992. The number of sea otters counted decreased by 75% between 1965 and 2000; 88% for islands at equilibrial density in 1965. The population decline likely began in the mid-1980s and declined at a rate of 17.5%/year in the 1990s. The minimal population estimate was 8,742 sea otters in 2000. The population declined to a uniformly low density in the archipelago, suggesting a common and geographically widespread cause. These data are in general agreement with the hypothesis of increased predation on sea otters. These data chronicle one of the most widespread and precipitous population declines for a mammalian carnivore in recorded history.

Angela M. Doroff, James A. Estes, M. Tim Tinker, Douglas M. Burn, and Thomas J. Evans "SEA OTTER POPULATION DECLINES IN THE ALEUTIAN ARCHIPELAGO," Journal of Mammalogy 84(1), 55-64, (1 February 2003). https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2003)084<0055:SOPDIT>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 July 2002; Published: 1 February 2003
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