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1 October 2005 LOCOMOTION IN AQUATIC, TERRESTRIAL, AND ARBOREAL HABITAT OF THICK-TAILED OPOSSUM, LUTREOLINA CRASSICAUDATA (DESMAREST, 1804)
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Abstract

The reasons Lutreolina crassicaudata is always captured in close proximity to water are not clear. We investigated locomotory behavior and performance in swimming, running, climbing, and jumping of L. crassicaudata. One adult male was videotaped in the laboratory while swimming, walking on the ground and on a horizontal tube 1.2 m from the ground, climbing a tree trunk angled 45°, and jumping gaps between supports. The locomotor cycles in these different activities were described by speed, stride length, stroke or stride frequency, time of power and recovery phases or stance and swing phases, and by displacement of points on the animal. L. crassicaudata employed a quadruped paddling gait in swimming. Swimming speed was similar to that of terrestrial didelphids, but stroke frequency and buoyancy ability were more similar to those of the water opossum. Different gaits were used for locomotion in each habitat type and we conclude that L. crassicaudata cannot be considered a specialized species for aquatic locomotion.

Ricardo Tadeu Santori, Oscar Rocha-Barbosa, Marcus Vinícius Vieira, José Aarão Magnan-Neto, and Mariana F. C. Loguercio "LOCOMOTION IN AQUATIC, TERRESTRIAL, AND ARBOREAL HABITAT OF THICK-TAILED OPOSSUM, LUTREOLINA CRASSICAUDATA (DESMAREST, 1804)," Journal of Mammalogy 86(5), 902-908, (1 October 2005). https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2005)86[902:LIATAA]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 14 February 2005; Published: 1 October 2005
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