Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2001 Failure of a Permethrin Treatment Regime to Protect Cattle Against Bluetongue Virus
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Holstein heifers in a confined feedlot setting on a southern California dairy were either sprayed individually along the ventral midline using 0.2% permethrin (250 ml/animal) (two pens) or were not treated (two pens). Treatments (n = 6 dates) were applied every 2 wk during the peak fall bluetongue virus transmission season (22 August–29 October). Animals seronegative for bluetongue virus antibodies at the initial bleeding on 15–18 September (n = 106 in the treatment pens and n = 117 in the control pens) were bled again for testing 2 mo later (12–13 November). Seroconversion rates were not significantly different: 56% for the treated animals and 48% for the controls (P > 0.2). The area has many essentially contiguous, confinement dairies with wastewater ponds that produce large numbers of Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, the primary bluetongue virus vector. Further, these dairies presumably provided a large reservoir of virus-infected cattle to infect vectors in the immediate area. Under these severe virus challenge conditions, permethrin applied at 2-wk intervals failed to reduce exposure to bluetongue virus.

Bradley A. Mullens, Alec C. Gerry, and Robert K. Velten "Failure of a Permethrin Treatment Regime to Protect Cattle Against Bluetongue Virus," Journal of Medical Entomology 38(5), 760-762, (1 September 2001). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585-38.5.760
Received: 15 August 2000; Accepted: 1 May 2001; Published: 1 September 2001
JOURNAL ARTICLE
3 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top