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1 June 2016 Effects of Increasing Temperature on Acoustic Advertisement in the Tettigoniidae
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Abstract

Acoustic communication in insects is vital for reproduction. In the family Tettigoniidae, certain features of acoustic signals are impacted by ambient temperature. The current study investigates the correlation between increased ambient temperature and signaling behavior in four species of katydids in two subfamilies under conditions that may be encountered as environmental temperatures continue to rise due to climate change. This is the first systematic investigation into the potential effects of temperature on song parameters in these four species. Individuals were tested at five different temperatures, ranging from 20 °C to 40 °C at 5°C intervals, and measurements were taken on six acoustic parameters: buzz duration, interbuzz interval (IBI) duration, number of ticks in the IBI, tick rate in the IBI, pulse rate within a buzz, and percent time spent calling. Results indicated a statistically significant effect of temperature on pulse rate, buzz duration, and interbuzz interval duration for all species tested. The percent time calling and buzz duration increased at higher temperatures in the single species in the subfamily Tettigoniinae, in contrast with the three species in the subfamily Conocephalinae which showed decreased percent time calling and reduced buzz duration in increased temperature. These results highlight the potential differences in the behavioral responses among different species to increasing global temperatures. Further research is necessary to assess the potential impact of variable calling parameters on female choice in these and other katydid species.

Dana A. Cusano, Leanna P. Matthews, Elyna Grapstein, and Susan E. Parks "Effects of Increasing Temperature on Acoustic Advertisement in the Tettigoniidae," Journal of Orthoptera Research 25(1), 39-47, (1 June 2016). https://doi.org/10.1665/034.025.0101
Published: 1 June 2016
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