Open Access
Translator Disclaimer
11 April 2022 Thailandina and Neothailandina and their family Thailandinidae salvaged: a valid taxonomic group of peculiar Permian fusuline Foraminifera
Katsumi Ueno
Author Affiliations +

The fusuline genera Thailandina Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968 and Neothailandina Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968 were established by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968) based on material from the Khao Phlong Phrab section of the Permian Rat Buri Limestone in central Thailand that is currently assigned to the Khao Khad Formation of the Saraburi Group (Ueno and Charoentitirat, 2011). These fusuline genera are peculiar in having parachomata and replaced tests by secondary mineralization. Moreover, Neothailandina was described to have a test with transverse septula, considered to be characteristic for Neoschwagerinidae. Based on these remarkable test features, Toriyama and Kanmera (1968) newly introduced the subfamily Thailandininae to accommodate these two new genera and assigned it to the Neoschwagerinidae, despite the lack of septula in Thailandina. Later, Kobayashi et al. (2010) argued that Thailandina and Neothailandina are just a mixed grouping of several known genera of schwagerinids, verbeekinids, and neoschwagerinids that are too altered by recrystallization to be recognizable, and rejected the taxonomic validity of these two genera as well as Thailandininae.

The Khao Phlong Phrab section represents one of the standard late Cisuralian–Guadalupian (late early–middle Permian) fusuline successions in the eastern Paleotethys (Zhang and Wang, 2018) and contains not only Thailandina and Neothailandina but also abundant schwagerinid, verbeekinid, and neoschwagerinid fusulines (Toriyama, 1975; Fig. 1). I investigated the original specimens described by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968) and Toriyama (1975) from the section that are housed in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences of Kyushu University, Japan. I found that most of the grounds for Kobayashi et al.'s (2010) arguments to regard the thailandinin genera as taxonomically invalid are not supported by observations on these specimens as explained in the account that follows. In this taxonomic note, I propose that Thailandina and Neothailandina, and their family Thailandinidae, should be retained as valid taxonomic groups.

Kobayashi et al. (2010) noted, while referring to a similar opinion by Rauzer-Chernousova et al. (1996), that Thailandina buravasi Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968 (Figs. 2.1–2.5, 3.13), the type species of the genus, merely represents replaced specimens of the genus Misellina Schenck and Thompson, 1940. In fact, Thailandina usually occurs together with several different species of Misellina (Figs. 1, 3.1–3.3, 3.9, 3.13), e.g., Misellina cf. Misellina termieri (Deprat, 1915) and Misellina confragaspira Leven, 1967, and also occurs with the somewhat similar Armenina saraburiensis (Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975) (Fig. 3.8) and Maklaya saraburiensis Kanmera and Toriyama, 1968 (Fig. 3.4). But, T. buravasi consistently has an ∼1.5–2 times larger test in axial length than coexisting Misellina, Armenina, and Maklaya spp. Thailandina hongnusonthiae Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968 (Fig. 2.7) and T. sp. A (Fig. 2.6) have even larger tests, which are definitely out of the size range of known Misellina spp. These observations conclude that Thailandina cannot be regarded as recrystallized specimens of coexisting Misellina, or even of the similar Armenina Miklukho-Maklay, 1955 and Maklaya Kanmera and Toriyama, 1968. Moreover, Kobayashi et al. (2010) thought that the apparent large to giant proloculi in thailandinin specimens are the mere result of recrystallization of (smaller) proloculi and the early few volutions of the test and thus, do not show the original size of the proloculus. However, this observation does not seem reasonable. As illustrated in Figures 2.1–2.3, 2.5–2.7, and 3.13, a circular wall seen in the central part of Thailandina makes a distinct boundary with the inner hollow space, which is filled with mosaic calcite crystals that are similar to sparry calcite cement surrounding fusuline tests in the same limestone sample. Additionally, there is no vestige of test structure inside the circular wall. These observations lead to an interpretation that the large spherical ‘openings’ in the central part of Thailandina tests could never be a replaced relict of small proloculi plus a few inner whorls, but indeed represent the proloculus. Neothailandina has even larger proloculi (Fig. 2.8–2.12, 2.16, 2.17) and, as in Thailandina, these specimens also have a sharp prolocular wall separating the inner hollow space and outer coiled chambers, although in some specimens (Fig. 2.8, 2.17), the wall becomes slightly vague. It is interesting to note that there is a somewhat irregular, large, first coiled chamber that surrounds the large proloculus in some Neothailandina specimens (Fig. 2.9, 2.11) and this resembles the circumproloculus chamber described by Thompson (1964, fig. 283). Thus, the large central ‘openings’ in both Thailandina and Neothailandina are not made by the selective recrystallization of the inner part of the tests, but are considered as innate morphology of these fusulines, i.e., the proloculus.

As for some Neothailandina (Fig. 2.8, 2.10, 2.15–2.18), Kobayashi et al. (2010) considered that they are probably referable to recrystallized Parafusulina-like schwagerinids. In this regard, they probably mistook regularly arranged semicircular structures seen in the lower part of chambers in the outer volutions of Neothailandina for septal loops in schwagerinids. In fact, there are a number of schwagerinid species, including those of Parafusulina Dunbar and Skinner, 1931, co-occurring with Neothailandina in the Khao Phlong Phrab section (Fig. 1). However, most associated Parafusulina spp. have elongate fusiform and cylindrical tests exemplified by Parafusulina japonica (Gümbel, 1874) (Fig. 3.12), and are fundamentally different in gross test morphology from thailandinids. Especially, Neothailandina komalarjuni Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968 (Fig. 2.17, 2.18), with its gigantic test, is not comparable to any schwagerinids from the section. There are a few species of Parafusulina and Pseudofusulina Dunbar and Skinner, 1931 that have fusiform or short cylindrical tests (e.g., Pseudofusulina kueichowensis obesa Sheng, 1963; Fig. 3.11). But, they have different internal test structures from thailandinids and so, these schwagerinids would not look like thailandinids even if they exhibited recrystallization. Kobayashi et al. (2010) also stated that some of Neothailandina (including the specimen illustrated in Fig. 2.14) are possibly recrystallized Neoschwagerinidae because vague, recrystallized partitions are preserved that probably correspond to transverse and axial septula. As shown in Fig. 1, there are a number of neoschwagerinid species from the Khao Phlong Phrab section and Toriyama (1975) illustrated somewhat large neoschwagerinid specimens, e.g., Neoschwagerina simplex simplex Ozawa, 1927 (Fig. 3.6) and Colania douvillei (Ozawa, 1922) (Fig. 3.7). However, the specimens of Neothailandina pitakpaivani Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968, which Kobayashi et al. (2010) considered to be replaced Neoschwagerinidae, occurred in samples Kpp-29 and Kpp-37 from the Maklaya pamirica Biozone (B4) (Fig. 1). In this interval, neoschwagerinids consist of Maklaya pamirica (Leven, 1967) (Fig. 3.5), Cancellina phlongphrabensis Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975 (Fig. 3.10), and Cancellina sp. A, and all of these species are much smaller than Neothailandina pitakpaivani. Thus, it is not likely that Neothailandina resulted from simple recrystallization of coexisting neoschwagerinids in the B4 biostratigraphic interval where the relevant Neothailandina pitakpaivani specimens were obtained.

Figure 1.

Stratigraphic ranges of Thailandina, Neothailandina, and associated major fusulines (schwagerinids, verbeekinids, and neoschwagerinids) in the Khao Phlong Phrab section of central Thailand (modified from Toriyama, 1975). Litho-/bioiostratigraphic units, A: mostly crystalline limestone, B1–B7: limestone, B1: Misellina otai-Misellina cf. Misselina termieri Biozone, B2: Misellina confragaspira Biozone, B3: Maklaya saraburiensis Biozone, B4: Maklaya pamirica Biozone, B5: Maklaya sethaputi Biozone, B6: Neoschwagerina simplex Biozone, B7: Presumatrina schellwieni Biozone, C: limestone conglomerate. Taxa include: Armenina saraburiensis (Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975); Cancellina neoschwagerinoides (Deprat, 1913); Cancellina phlongphrabensis Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975; Cancellina tenuitesta Kanmera, 1963; Colania douvillei (Ozawa, 1922); Maklaya pamirica (Leven, 1967); Maklaya saraburiensis Kanmera and Toriyama, 1968; Maklaya sethaputi Kanmera and Toriyama, 1968; Misellina claudiae (Deprat, 1912); Misellina confragaspira Leven, 1967; Misellina ovalis (Deprat, 1915); Misellina otai Sakaguchi and Sugano, 1966; Misellina subelliptica (Deprat, 1915); Misellina cf. Misellina termieri (Deprat, 1915); Neoschwagerina schuberti Kochansky-Devidé, 1958; Neoschwagerina simplex simplex Ozawa, 1927; Neoschwagerina simplex tenuis Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975; Neothailandina komalarjuni Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968; Neothailandina pitakpaivani Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968; Parafusulina cf. Parafusulina elliptica Sheng, 1963; Parafusulina granumavenae (Roemer, 1880); Parafusulina gruperaensis brevica Sheng, 1963; Parafusulina gruperaensis gruperaensis Thompson and Miller, 1944; Parafusulina japonica (Gümbel, 1874); Parafusulina kaerimizensis (Ozawa, 1925); Parafusulina nosonensis Thompson and Wheeler in Thompson, Wheeler, and Hazzard, 1946; Parafusulina quasigruperaensis Sheng, 1963; Parafusulina cf. Parafusulina sapperi (Staff, 1912); Parafusulina yabei Hanzawa, 1942; Presumatrina cf. Presumatrina grandis Leven, 1967; Presumatrina schellwieni (Deprat, 1913); Pseudofusulina kueichowensis obesa Sheng, 1963; Pseudofusulina regularis (Schellwien, 1898); Pseudofusulina cf. Pseudofusulina uenoensis Kobayashi, 1957; Schwagerina cf. Schwagerina. gangpianshanensis Sheng, 1965; Thailandina buravasi Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968; Thailandina hongnusonthiae Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968.

img-z2-1_485.jpg

Figure 2.

Thailandina and Neothailandina reported by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968) from the Khao Phlong Phrab section of central Thailand. Original photomicrographs from Toriyama and Kanmera's (1968) thin sections; plate and figure numbers in parentheses denote those by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968). (1–5): Thailandina buravasi Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968: (1) axial section of holotype (GK.D14009; pl. 6, fig. 1), Kpp-5; (2, 3) axial sections (pl. 6, figs. 5, 7), Kpp-5 and Kpp-24; (4) axial section of microspheric specimen (pl. 6, fig. 8), Kpp-5; (5) sagittal section (pl. 6, fig. 13), Kpp-5; (6) Thailandina sp. A, axial section (pl. 6, fig. 16), Kpp-10; (7) Thailandina hongnusonthiae Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968: axial section of holotype (GK.D13712a; pl. 7, fig. 1), Kpp-20; (8–16) Neothailandina pitakpaivani Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968: (8) axial section of holotype (GK.D13074a; pl. 7, fig. 9), Kpp-39; (9, 10, 12) sagittal sections (pl. 8, figs. 4, 5, 7), Kpp-30 and Kpp-39; (11, 15, 16) axial sections (pl. 7, figs. 10, 12, 14), Kpp-29, Kpp-37, and Kpp-51; (13) tangential section (pl. 7, fig. 19), Kpp-39; (14) oblique section (pl. 7, fig. 17), Kpp-29; (17, 18): Neothailandina komalarjuni Toriyama and Kanmera, 1968: (17) axial section (pl. 8, fig. 12), Kpp-51; (18) tangential section (pl. 8, fig. 14), Kpp-46. Scale bar = 1 mm (applicable to all specimens).

img-z3-3_485.jpg

Figure 3.

Major schwagerinid, verbeekinid, and neoschwagerinid fusulines associated with Thailandina and Neothailandina from the Khao Phlong Phrab section of central Thailand, as reported by Toriyama (1975). Original photomicrographs from Toriyama's (1975) thin sections; plate and figure numbers in parentheses in (112) denote those by Toriyama (1975). (1) Misellina cf. Misellina termieri (Deprat, 1915), axial section (pl. 12, fig. 7), Kpp-9; (2) Misellina confragaspira Leven, 1967, axial section (pl. 12, fig. 11), Kpp-5; (3) Misellina claudiae (Deprat, 1912), axial section (pl. 13, fig. 1), Kpp-23; (4) Maklaya saraburiensis Kanmera and Toriyama, 1968, axial section (pl. 18, fig. 21), Kpp-22; (5) Maklaya pamirica (Leven, 1967), axial section (pl. 18, fig. 16), Kpp-39; (6) Neoschwagerina simplex simplex Ozawa, 1927, axial section (pl. 19, fig. 26), Kpp-52; (7) Colania douvillei (Ozawa, 1922), axial section (pl. 20, fig. 23), Kpp-77; (8) Armenina saraburiensis (Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975), axial section (pl. 13, fig. 16), Kpp-9; (9) Misellina subelliptica (Deprat, 1915), axial section (pl. 12, fig. 3), Kpp-24; (10) Cancellina phlongphrabensis Toriyama and Kanmera in Toriyama, 1975, axial section (pl. 16, fig. 18), Kpp-34; (11) Pseudofusulina kueichowensis obesa Sheng, 1963, axial section (pl. 2, fig. 5), Kpp-21; (12) Parafusulina japonica (Gümbel, 1874), axial section (pl. 5, fig. 4), Kpp-38; (13) Thailandina buravasi (left) and Misellina cf. Misellina termieri (right) showing two different modes of preservation in the same thin section, Kpp-5; this photomicrograph has almost the same field of view as that shown by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968, pl. 8, fig. 15)—note that the proloculus and the chambers of T. buravasi are filled with sparry calcite cement that has a similar nature to that seen in interstitial spaces between grains in this limestone. Scale bars = 1 mm.

img-z4-1_485.jpg

The above-mentioned various lines of evidence lead to a conclusion that Thailandina and Neothailandina are not mere taphotaxa (Lucas, 2001) formed in the course of diagenesis, but are indeed existing taxonomic entities that can be characterized by recrystallized tests probably originally of aragonite (e.g., Fig. 3.13) and parachomata (e.g., Fig. 2.1, 2.16). Moreover, Neothailandina has partitions of the chambers, which correspond to transverse septula (Fig. 2.13, 2.15, 2.18). The supposed original aragonitic test mineralogy in Thailandinidae suggests a close phylogenetic relationship to the existing fusuline family Staffellidae (Vachard et al., 2010), but the development of parachomata and transverse septula is disparate from that family. In view of the higher taxonomy of the fusulines, therefore, Thailandina and Neothailandina should be considered as forming a distinct family that constitutes a small collateral clade of Staffellidae in the superfamily Staffelloidea of the order Fusulinida.

In conclusion, contrary to Kobayashi et al.'s (2010) arguments, Thailandina and Neothailandina, and the higher taxon Thailandinidae to include these genera, should be retained as taxonomically valid and included in the Staffelloidea in fusuline systematics. Kobayashi et al. (2010) assumed, while referring to a notable photomicrograph by Toriyama and Kanmera (1968, pl. 8, fig. 15) showing Thailandina with a recrystallized test in close association with well-preserved Misellina (Fig. 3.13), that it appears to be an exceptional example of (selective) metamorphic recrystallization. However, my thorough observation of Toriyama and Kanmera's (1968) and Toriyama's (1975) Khao Phlong Phrab material concludes that this case can be of universal application to all of the co-occurrences of thailandinids and other microgranular fusulines from the section. In those samples, all tests of Thailandinidae are invariably recrystallized whereas microgranular species are always well preserved. Kobayashi et al. (2010) further argued that sedimentary reworking of specimens at a disconformity can also potentially produce a mixture of specimens in different preservation states. As noted above, however, the internal spaces (proloculus and chambers) of thailandinid tests are filled with the same type of cement found in the interstitial spaces between grains in the host limestone (Fig. 3.13). That interpretation is, therefore, rejected for the Khao Phlong Phrab thailandinids. Kobayashi et al. (2010, fig. 1) illustrated schwagerinid, neoschwagerinid, and verbeekinid fusuline specimens from the Akasaka Limestone of central Japan that represent several different states of contact metamorphic alteration from partial recrystallization to complete degradation of tests. Using this example, they intended to demonstrate that thailandinids were made by a similar metamorphic process affected on other microgranular fusulines. But, those illustrated fusulines show an essentially different recrystallization appearance from thailandinid specimens in the Khao Phlong Phrab section (e.g., Fig. 3.13). Recrystallization of the latter is due probably to the mineralogical change from aragonite to calcite in their tests, which occurred during early diagenesis. It is a different content from contact metamorphism.

A similar occurrence in the mixture of recrystallized Thailandina and well-preserved microgranular fusulines (verbeekinids and neoschwagerinids) was also reported by Zhou and Liengjarern (2007) from the Nong Pong Formation of the Saraburi Group, located ∼40 km east of Khao Phlong Phrab. In that area, Thailandina shows identical test features to those from the Khao Phlong Phrab section, representing a slightly recrystallized appearance, whereas associated verbeekinids and neoschwagerinids retain their original microgranular test walls. This occurrence gives additional supporting evidence that thailandinids are not mere accidental products made by local metamorphism on particular limestones containing Misellina, Parafusulina-like schwagerinids, and other neoschwagerinids, but they comprise a valid taxonomic group characterized by inherent aragonitic test mineralogy.

Acknowledgments

I thank H. Sano (Kyushu University, Japan) for providing access to Toriyama and Kanmera's (1968) and Toriyama's (1975) thin sections housed in Kyushu University's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (GK.D). I am also grateful to M.K. Nestell (University of Texas at Arlington, USA) and Y. Wang (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for their constructive reviews, and to J.S. Jin and G. Nestell for editorial suggestions.

References

1.

Deprat, J., 1912, Étude géologique du Yun-Nan oriental, 3e partie: Étude des Fusulinidés de Chine et d'Indochine et classification des calcaires à Fusulines: Mémoires du Service Géologique de l'Indochine, v. 1, fasc. 3, p. 1–76. Google Scholar

2.

Deprat, J., 1913, Étude des Fusulinidés de Chine et d'Indochine et classification des calcaires à fusulines (2e Mémoire): Les Fusulinidés des calcaires carbonifériens et permiens du Tonkin, du Laos et du Nord-Annam: Mémoires du Service Géologique de l'Indochine, v. 2, fasc. 1, p. 1–74. Google Scholar

3.

Deprat, J., 1915, Étude des Fusulinidés de Chine et d'Indochine et classification des calcaires à fusulines (4e Mémoire): Les Fusulinidés des calcaires carbonifériens et permiens du Tonkin, du Laos et du Nord-Annam: Mémoires du Service Géologique de l'Indochine, v. 4, fasc. 1, p. 1–30. Google Scholar

4.

Dunbar, C.O., and Skinner, J.W., 1931, New fusulinid genera from the Permian of west Texas: American Journal of Science, ser. 5, v. 22, p. 252–268. Google Scholar

5.

Gümbel, C.W. von, 1874, Japanesische Gesteine: Das Ausland, v. 47, p. 479–480. Google Scholar

6.

Hanzawa, S., 1942, Parafusulina yabei n. sp. from Tomuro, Simotuke Province, Japan: Japanese Journal of Geology and Geography, v. 18, p. 127–131. Google Scholar

7.

Kanmera, K., 1963, Fusulines of the middle Permian Kozaki Formation of southern Kyushu: Memoirs of the Faculty of Science, Kuyshu University, ser. D, Geology, v 14, p. 79–141. Google Scholar

8.

Kanmera, K., and Toriyama, R., 1968, Fusulinacean fossils from Thailand, Part 3: Maklaya, new generic designation for neoschwagerinids of the group of Cancellina pamirica Leven, in Kobayashi, T., and Toriyama, R., eds., Geology and Palaeontology of Southeast Asia, Volume 5: Tokyo, University of Tokyo Press, p. 31–46. Google Scholar

9.

Kobayashi, F., Ross, C.A., and Ross, J.R.P., 2010, Thailandina and Neothailandina, and their subfamily Thailandininae: An example of an invalid taxonomic group of Permian fusuline Foraminifera: Journal of Paleontology, v. 84, p. 360–361,  https://doi.org/10.1666/09-065R1.1Google Scholar

10.

Kobayashi, M., 1957, Paleontological study of the Ibukiyama Limestone, Shiga Prefecture, central Japan: Science Reports of the Tokyo Kyoiku Daigaku, ser. C, Geology, Mineralogy and Geography, v. 5, p. 247–311. Google Scholar

11.

Kochansky-Devidé, V., 1958, Die Neoschwagerinenfaunen der südlichen Crna Gora (Jugoslavien): Geološki Vjesnik, v. 11, p. 45–76. Google Scholar

12.

Leven, E.Y., 1967, [Stratigrafiya i fuzulinidy permskikh otlozheniy Pamira]: Akademiya Nauk SSSR, Trudy Geologicheskogo Instituta, v. 167, p. 1–224. [in Russian] Google Scholar

13.

Lucas, S.G., 2001, Taphotaxon: Lethaia, v. 34, p. 30,  https://doi.org/10.1080/002411601300068198Google Scholar

14.

Miklukho-Maklay, A.D., 1955, [Novye dannye o permskikh fuzulinidakh yuzhnykh rayonov SSSR]: Doklady Akademii Nauk SSSR, v. 105, p. 573–576. [in Russian] Google Scholar

15.

Ozawa, Y., 1922, [Preliminary note on the classification of the family Fusulinidae]: Journal of the Geological Society of Japan, v. 29, p. 357–374. [in Japanese] Google Scholar

16.

Ozawa, Y., 1925, Paleontological and stratigraphical studies on the Permo-Carboniferous limestone of Nagato, Part 2, Paleontology: Journal of the College of Science, Imperial University of Tokyo, v. 45, no. 6, p. 1–90. Google Scholar

17.

Ozawa, Y., 1927, Stratigraphical studies of the Fusulina Limestone of Akasaka, Province of Mino: Journal of the Faculty of Science, Imperial University of Tokyo, Section 2, Geology, Mineralogy, Geography, Seismology, v. 2, p. 121–164. Google Scholar

18.

Rauzer-Chernousova, D.M., Bensh, F.S., Vdovenko, M.V., Gibshman, N.B., Leven, E.Ya., Lipina, O.A., Reitlinger, E.A., Solov'eva, M.N., and Chediya, I.O., 1996, [Spravochnik po Sistematike Foraminifer Paleozoya]: Moscow, Nauka, 207 p. [in Russian] Google Scholar

19.

Roemer, F., 1880, Über eine Kohlenkalk-Fauna der Westküste von Sumatra: Palaeontographica, v. 27, p. 1–11. Google Scholar

20.

Sakaguchi, S., and Sugano, K., 1966, A new species of Misellina from the Akiyoshi Limestone at the Kaerimizu Sink Hole, Yamaguchi Prefecture, southwest Japan: Memoirs of the Osaka University of the Liberal Arts and Education, ser. B, Natural Science, v. 15, p. 143–152. Google Scholar

21.

Schellwien, E., 1898, Die Fauna des karnischen Fusulinenkalks, Teil 2, Foraminifera: Palaeontographica, v. 44, p. 237–282. Google Scholar

22.

Schenck, H.G., and Thompson, M.L., 1940, Misellina and Brevaxina, new Permian fusulinid Foraminifera: Journal of Paleontology, v. 14, p. 584–589. Google Scholar

23.

Sheng, J.C., 1963, Permian fusulinids of Kwangsi, Kueichow and Szechuan: Palaeontologica Sinica, n. ser. B, no. 10, p. 1–247. Google Scholar

24.

Sheng, J.C., 1965, [Fusulinids from the western part of Hainan Island, Kwangtung Province]: Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, v. 13, p. 563–579. [in Chinese with English abstract and new species description] Google Scholar

25.

Staff, H. von, 1912, Monographie der Fusulinen, Teil 3, Die Fusulinen (Schellwienien) Nordamerikas: Palaeontographica, v. 59, p. 157–192. Google Scholar

26.

Thompson, M.L., 1964, Fusulinacea, in Loeblich, A.R., Jr., and Tappan, H., eds., Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part C, Protista 2, Sarcodina Chiefly ‘Thecamoebians’ and Foraminiferida: Boulder and Lawrence, Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press, p. C358–C436. Google Scholar

27.

Thompson, M.L., and Miller, A.K., 1944, The Permian of southernmost Mexico and its fusulinid faunas: Journal of Paleontology, v. 18, p. 481–504. Google Scholar

28.

Thompson, M.L., Wheeler, H.E., and Hazzard, J.C., 1946, Permian fusulinids of California: Geological Society of America Memoir, v. 17, p. 1–77. Google Scholar

29.

Toriyama, R., 1975, Fusuline fossils from Thailand, Part 9, Permian fusulines from the Ratburi Limestone in the Khao Phlong Phrab area, Sara Buri, central Thailand: Memoires of the Faculty of Science, Kyushu University, ser. D, Geology, v. 23, p. 1–116. Google Scholar

30.

Toriyama, R., and Kanmera, K., 1968, Fusulinacean fossils from Thailand, Part 2, Two new Permian genera from Thailand, in Kobayashi, T., and Toriyama, R., eds., Geology and Palaeontology of Southeast Asia, Volume 4: Tokyo, University of Tokyo Press, p. 29–44. Google Scholar

31.

Ueno, K., and Charoentitirat, T., 2011, Carboniferous and Permian, in Ridd, M.F., Barber, A.J., and Crow, M.J., eds., The Geology of Thailand: London, The Geological Society, p. 71–136. Google Scholar

32.

Vachard, D., Pille, L., and Gaillot, J., 2010, Palaeozoic Foraminifera: Systematics, palaeoecology and responses to global changes: Revue de Micropaléontologie, v. 53, p. 209–254,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.revmic.2010.10.001Google Scholar

33.

Zhang, Y.C., and Wang, Y., 2018, Permian fusuline biostratigraphy, in Lucas, S.G., and Shen, S.Z., eds., The Permian Timescale: London, The Geological Society, Special Publications no. 450, p. 253–288,  https://doi.org/10.1144/SP450.14Google Scholar

34.

Zhou, Z.R., and Liengjarern, M., 2007, Early Permian verbeekinacean fusulinids associated with ammonoid Perrinites from Thailand: Acta Micropalaeontologica Sinica, v. 24, p. 346–358. Google Scholar
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Paleontological Society.
Katsumi Ueno "Thailandina and Neothailandina and their family Thailandinidae salvaged: a valid taxonomic group of peculiar Permian fusuline Foraminifera," Journal of Paleontology 96(2), 485-490, (11 April 2022). https://doi.org/10.1017/jpa.2021.88
Accepted: 14 August 2021; Published: 11 April 2022
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES


Share
SHARE
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top