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1 October 2016 A Novel Peptide Derived from Haliotis discus hannai Inhibits the Migration of Mkn-28 Gastric Cancer Cells through Downregulation of β-Catenin Signaling
Nan-Hee Kim, Chang-Won Kang, Min-Seok Park, Chul-Woong Oh, Yong Bae Seo, Jong Kyu Lee, Jong-Myoung Kim, Han Kyu Lim, Gun-Do Kim
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Abstract

Abalones are edible shellfish and a valuable food source in Asian countries. Although substances from abalone have bioactivities, such as anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, anti-metastatic effects of abalone have not been fully revealed. Gastric cancer is a common malignant cancer, but prognosis is poor because of its high metastatic characteristics. In this study, a novel peptide (A2) from abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) was applied to investigate its antimetastatic effects in MKN-28 gastric cancer cells. Enhanced activities of glycogen-synthase kinase 3β(GSK-3β) by A2 treatment contributed to modulation of β-catenin; hence, β-catenin signaling was downregulated, and translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus was repressed. Moreover, cellular protrusions including lamellipodia and filopodia were disrupted through downregulation of Rac1 and Cdc42 in response to A2 in MKN-28 cells. It is suggested that A2 inhibits cell migration through controlling levels of β-catenin, GSK-3β, and also induced disorganization of lamellipodia and filopodia. Therefore, A2 possesses therapeutic properties to treat gastric cancer.

Nan-Hee Kim, Chang-Won Kang, Min-Seok Park, Chul-Woong Oh, Yong Bae Seo, Jong Kyu Lee, Jong-Myoung Kim, Han Kyu Lim, and Gun-Do Kim "A Novel Peptide Derived from Haliotis discus hannai Inhibits the Migration of Mkn-28 Gastric Cancer Cells through Downregulation of β-Catenin Signaling," Journal of Shellfish Research 35(3), 669-675, (1 October 2016). https://doi.org/10.2983/035.035.0313
Published: 1 October 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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KEYWORDS
abolone
CDC42
gastric cancer
Haliotis discus hannai
RAC1
β-catenin signaling
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