Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2007 USE OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO ASSESS THE FEASIBILITY OF GROUND- AND AERIAL-BASED ADULTICIDING FOR WEST NILE VIRUS CONTROL IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA
SUNNY MAK, MIEKE BULLER, ALLEN FURNELL, LAURA MACDOUGALL, BONNIE HENRY
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis of 34 forecasted high West Nile virus (WNV) risk communities in British Columbia (BC), Canada was useful to assess feasibility and planning of the operational logistics of an emergency spray event in advance of a WNV outbreak. The geographic coverage and operational time required to perform ground- and aerial-based ultra-low volume (ULV) adulticiding were calculated using GIS. The mean geographic coverages of the ground-, aerial-, and combination of ground- and aerial-based adulticiding strategies were 39%, 61%, and 69%, respectively. The driving distance, driving time, and number of treatment nights required to perform ground-based spraying of an entire community were also calculated. Due to the large variability of treatment coverage estimates within and among the communities, no single treatment method was identified as the best strategy for province-wide ULV adulticiding in BC. Instead, the strategy for each community should be examined individually with local knowledge and expertise.

SUNNY MAK, MIEKE BULLER, ALLEN FURNELL, LAURA MACDOUGALL, and BONNIE HENRY "USE OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO ASSESS THE FEASIBILITY OF GROUND- AND AERIAL-BASED ADULTICIDING FOR WEST NILE VIRUS CONTROL IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 23(4), 396-404, (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.2987/5609.1
Published: 1 December 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top