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1 June 2009 Efficacy of Residual Bifenthrin Applied to Landscape Vegetation Against Aedes albopictus
Melissa A. Doyle, Daniel L. Kline, Sandra A. Allan, Phillip E. Kaufman
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Abstract

The daytime biting mosquito Aedes albopictus is a nuisance pest commonly found in suburban yards. The recommended course of treatment for Ae. albopictus is to keep yards free of water-holding containers; however, infestations may require additional control methods such as residual pesticide applications to vegetation. Five plants commonly found in yards or in uncultivated areas in Gainesville, FL were chosen as substrates for evaluation of the effectiveness of residual bifenthrin against 5–7-day-old female Ae. albopictus. Knockdown of mosquitoes after 1 h of exposure was highest the day of and 7 days after treatment. Plant species clearly impacted the effectiveness of residual bifenthrin. One-hour knockdown 7 days after treatment remained high (>62%) only on azalea and holly bush vegetation. Knockdown counts 24 h after exposure demonstrated that residual efficacy of bifenthrin was highest on azalea, with >77% mortality for up to 35 days. Additional bioassays revealed significant differences in the knockdown rates of male, female, gravid, and blood-fed Ae. albopictus exposed to residual bifenthrin treatments, with the highest knockdown observed on the day of and 7 days after treatment.

Melissa A. Doyle, Daniel L. Kline, Sandra A. Allan, and Phillip E. Kaufman "Efficacy of Residual Bifenthrin Applied to Landscape Vegetation Against Aedes albopictus," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 25(2), 179-183, (1 June 2009). https://doi.org/10.2987/08-5804.1
Published: 1 June 2009
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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